Minecraft investigation creates confusion in Turkey

Press/Media: Expert Comment

Description

The Turkish government's inquiry set up last month to review whether or not Minecraft is too violent concluded that the game should be banned in the country. The investigation has been met with criticism, both from players and academics, who believe that the grounds are doubtful.

It all started already in February, explains Tonguc Ibrahim Sezen, who is a professor at Bilgi University in Istanbul. A journalist asked the Minister for Family and Social Affairs if she had heard of Minecraft, to which the answer was no. The journalist in question then described Minecraft as a violent game where the player is rewarded for murdering his partner. The Minister reacted strongly and this became the basis for the investigation that was appointed, which has now come to the conclusion that the game is too violent and should be banned.

Tonguc Ibrahim Sezen says that the investigation upset players who also started campaigns against the ban. Academics, in turn, question the methodology behind the investigation and the parents, say Sezen, are confused. As the Turkish gaming industry has grown, Minecraft has also entered more and more homes and in various family forums concerns are expressed about how the game affects the children. Turkey already has a history where many websites have been censored, but a widespread problem with censorship of games do not currently exist. However, there is a concern that it may change, he continues.

The information that created the headlines comes from the excerpt published by the Turkish newspaper Habertürk. The investigation is not available for inspection. Tonguc Ibrahim Sezen also believes that, in general, there is a problem with understanding gambling in the country, both among parents, the media but also among politicians.

Period13 Mar 2015

Media contributions

1

Media contributions

  • Title“Minecraft-utredningen skapar förvirring i Turkiet” (Minecraft investigation creates confusion in Turkey)
    Degree of recognitionNational
    Media name/outletSwedish Public Radio
    Media typeRadio
    Duration/Length/Size2:30 min.
    CountrySweden
    Date13/03/15
    DescriptionThe Turkish government's inquiry set up last month to review whether or not Minecraft is too violent concluded that the game should be banned in the country. The investigation has been met with criticism, both from players and academics, who believe that the grounds are doubtful.
    It all started already in February, explains Tonguc Ibrahim Sezen, who is a professor at Bilgi University in Istanbul. A journalist asked the Minister for Family and Social Affairs if she had heard of Minecraft, to which the answer was no. The journalist in question then described Minecraft as a violent game where the player is rewarded for murdering his partner. The Minister reacted strongly and this became the basis for the investigation that was appointed, which has now come to the conclusion that the game is too violent and should be banned.
    Tonguc Ibrahim Sezen says that the investigation upset players who also started campaigns against the ban. Academics, in turn, question the methodology behind the investigation and the parents, say Sezen, are confused. As the Turkish gaming industry has grown, Minecraft has also entered more and more homes and in various family forums concerns are expressed about how the game affects the children. Turkey already has a history where many websites have been censored, but a widespread problem with censorship of games do not currently exist. However, there is a concern that it may change, he continues.
    The information that created the headlines comes from the excerpt published by the Turkish newspaper Habertürk. The investigation is not available for inspection. Tonguc Ibrahim Sezen also believes that, in general, there is a problem with understanding gambling in the country, both among parents, the media but also among politicians.
    Producer/AuthorKalle Kovács
    URLhttps://sverigesradio.se/artikel/6115432
    PersonsTonguc Sezen