A case control and follow up study of ‘Hard to Reach’ young people who suffered from multiple complex mental disorders

Nigel Camilleri, Dorothy Newbury-Birch, Paul McArdle, Deborah D. Stocken, Tony Thick, Ann Le Couteur

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    115 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    • HTRYP presented with more disadvantage and psychopathology than those YP attending standard community mental health teams (CMHT). • HTRYP may benefit from a flexible, individualized, resource intense service that includes an outreach capability to maximise engagement, assessment and intervention planning. The HTRYP who engaged with IP, received a package of care with low use of medication and low admission rates to inpatient beds compared with those YP attending regular CMHT. • For some HTRYP at 2 year follow up, the absence of unstable accommodation together with positive change in both mental state and social function at follow up review could be con-sidered as positive outcomes in contrast to the poor prognosis that is usually associated with the term ‘Hard to Reach’. • Perhaps the term ‘Hard to Reach’ would be more appropriate as a descriptor of an aspect of current circumstances for some individuals with complex mental disorders rather than a de-scriptor of both poor engagement with services and poor longer term prognosis. • Despite multiple attempts by the Innovations Project, some HTRYP could not be engaged.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)-
    JournalChild and Adolescent Mental Health
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 10 Dec 2016

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A case control and follow up study of ‘Hard to Reach’ young people who suffered from multiple complex mental disorders'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this