A case control and follow up study of ‘Hard to Reach’ young people who suffered from multiple complex mental disorders

Nigel Camilleri, Dorothy Newbury-Birch, Paul McArdle, Deborah D. Stocken, Tony Thick, Ann Le Couteur

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    Abstract

    • HTRYP presented with more disadvantage and psychopathology than those YP attending standard community mental health teams (CMHT). • HTRYP may benefit from a flexible, individualized, resource intense service that includes an outreach capability to maximise engagement, assessment and intervention planning. The HTRYP who engaged with IP, received a package of care with low use of medication and low admission rates to inpatient beds compared with those YP attending regular CMHT. • For some HTRYP at 2 year follow up, the absence of unstable accommodation together with positive change in both mental state and social function at follow up review could be con-sidered as positive outcomes in contrast to the poor prognosis that is usually associated with the term ‘Hard to Reach’. • Perhaps the term ‘Hard to Reach’ would be more appropriate as a descriptor of an aspect of current circumstances for some individuals with complex mental disorders rather than a de-scriptor of both poor engagement with services and poor longer term prognosis. • Despite multiple attempts by the Innovations Project, some HTRYP could not be engaged.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)-
    JournalChild and Adolescent Mental Health
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 10 Dec 2016

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    Mental Disorders
    Mental Health
    Psychopathology
    Inpatients

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    abstract = "• HTRYP presented with more disadvantage and psychopathology than those YP attending standard community mental health teams (CMHT). • HTRYP may benefit from a flexible, individualized, resource intense service that includes an outreach capability to maximise engagement, assessment and intervention planning. The HTRYP who engaged with IP, received a package of care with low use of medication and low admission rates to inpatient beds compared with those YP attending regular CMHT. • For some HTRYP at 2 year follow up, the absence of unstable accommodation together with positive change in both mental state and social function at follow up review could be con-sidered as positive outcomes in contrast to the poor prognosis that is usually associated with the term ‘Hard to Reach’. • Perhaps the term ‘Hard to Reach’ would be more appropriate as a descriptor of an aspect of current circumstances for some individuals with complex mental disorders rather than a de-scriptor of both poor engagement with services and poor longer term prognosis. • Despite multiple attempts by the Innovations Project, some HTRYP could not be engaged.",
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    A case control and follow up study of ‘Hard to Reach’ young people who suffered from multiple complex mental disorders. / Camilleri, Nigel; Newbury-Birch, Dorothy; McArdle, Paul; Stocken, Deborah D.; Thick, Tony; Le Couteur, Ann.

    In: Child and Adolescent Mental Health, 10.12.2016, p. -.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    AU - Newbury-Birch, Dorothy

    AU - McArdle, Paul

    AU - Stocken, Deborah D.

    AU - Thick, Tony

    AU - Le Couteur, Ann

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    AB - • HTRYP presented with more disadvantage and psychopathology than those YP attending standard community mental health teams (CMHT). • HTRYP may benefit from a flexible, individualized, resource intense service that includes an outreach capability to maximise engagement, assessment and intervention planning. The HTRYP who engaged with IP, received a package of care with low use of medication and low admission rates to inpatient beds compared with those YP attending regular CMHT. • For some HTRYP at 2 year follow up, the absence of unstable accommodation together with positive change in both mental state and social function at follow up review could be con-sidered as positive outcomes in contrast to the poor prognosis that is usually associated with the term ‘Hard to Reach’. • Perhaps the term ‘Hard to Reach’ would be more appropriate as a descriptor of an aspect of current circumstances for some individuals with complex mental disorders rather than a de-scriptor of both poor engagement with services and poor longer term prognosis. • Despite multiple attempts by the Innovations Project, some HTRYP could not be engaged.

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