A comparison of the immediate effects of moderate exercise in the early morning and late afternoon on core temperature and cutaneous thermoregulatory mechanisms

H. Aldemir, G. Atkinson, T. Cable, B. Edwards, J. Waterhouse, T. Reilly

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    44 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Twelve healthy male subjects each undertook two bouts of moderate exercise (70% VO2max for 30 minutes) in the morning (08:00) and late afternoon (18:00) at least 4 days apart. Measurements were made of heart rate, core (rectal) temperature, sternum skin temperature, and forearm skin blood flow during baseline conditions, during the bout of exercise, and throughout a 30-minute recovery period. Comparisons were made of the changes of heart rate, temperature, and skin blood flow produced by the exercise at the two times of day. Student t tests indicated that baseline values for core temperature (37.15°C ± 0.06°C vs. 36.77°C ± 0.06°C) and sternum temperature (33.60°C ± 0.29°C vs. 32.70°C ± 0.38°C) were significantly (p<.05) higher in the late afternoon than the early morning. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated that the increases in core and sternum temperatures during exercise were significantly less (p = .0039 and .0421, respectively) during the afternoon bout of exercise compared with the morning, even though the work loads, as determined by changes in heart rate, were not significantly different (p = .798) at the two times of testing. There were also tendencies for resting forearm skin blood flow to be higher in the afternoon than in the morning and for exercise to produce a more rapid rise in this variable in the afternoon. The possible mechanisms producing these responses to exercise are discussed in terms of those that are responsible for the normal circadian rhythm of core temperature. It is concluded that the body's ability to remove a heat load is less in the early morning, when the circadian system is in a 'heat gain' mode, than in the late afternoon, when heat gain and 'heat loss' modes are balanced more evenly.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)197-207
    Number of pages11
    JournalChronobiology International
    Volume17
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 11 Apr 2000

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