Application and interpretation of the yo-yo intermittent recovery test to the long-term physical development of girls association football players

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Abstract

We aimed examine yo-yo intermittent recovery test, level 1 (YYIRL1) performance in girls football players. Mixed-linear modelling was used to determine within-season changes in YYIRL1 performance and between and within- player variation over four years, at four time points (July, September, December and May) in 86 players (474 observations). Twenty-three players, tested over three consecutive years were retained for further analysis. Magnitude-based inferences were used to quantify annual change in performance on a group and individual level. Within player correlations were used to determine the association between YYIRL1 and maturation. ‘Very likely’ small (14, ±90% confidence interval 8.1 – 20%) improvements were observed between July and September
and ‘possibly’ trivial (5.5, 0.41 to 11%) differences between September and May. Within-player variation throughout the in-season period, representing the typical error of the estimate was 23%, 22 – 25% and between-player, 38, 33 – 44%. We observed ‘most likely’ moderate improvements (32, 17 to 49%) over three years that were moderately associated with changes in maturation (r = 0.46, 0.13 to 0.70). A minimum change of ≥44% is required to detect ‘likely’ improvements in YYIRL1 performance on an individual basis. Girls football players appear responsive to pre-season training and to long-term exposure to systematic training.
Original languageEnglish
JournalScience and Medicine in Football
Early online date25 Apr 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 25 Apr 2019

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Football
maturation
Confidence Intervals
confidence interval
test
modeling
Maturation

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@article{aa12ca73df01433d96a83ec827394644,
title = "Application and interpretation of the yo-yo intermittent recovery test to the long-term physical development of girls association football players",
abstract = "We aimed examine yo-yo intermittent recovery test, level 1 (YYIRL1) performance in girls football players. Mixed-linear modelling was used to determine within-season changes in YYIRL1 performance and between and within- player variation over four years, at four time points (July, September, December and May) in 86 players (474 observations). Twenty-three players, tested over three consecutive years were retained for further analysis. Magnitude-based inferences were used to quantify annual change in performance on a group and individual level. Within player correlations were used to determine the association between YYIRL1 and maturation. ‘Very likely’ small (14, ±90{\%} confidence interval 8.1 – 20{\%}) improvements were observed between July and Septemberand ‘possibly’ trivial (5.5, 0.41 to 11{\%}) differences between September and May. Within-player variation throughout the in-season period, representing the typical error of the estimate was 23{\%}, 22 – 25{\%} and between-player, 38, 33 – 44{\%}. We observed ‘most likely’ moderate improvements (32, 17 to 49{\%}) over three years that were moderately associated with changes in maturation (r = 0.46, 0.13 to 0.70). A minimum change of ≥44{\%} is required to detect ‘likely’ improvements in YYIRL1 performance on an individual basis. Girls football players appear responsive to pre-season training and to long-term exposure to systematic training.",
author = "Matthew Wright and Alison Innerd",
year = "2019",
month = "4",
day = "25",
doi = "10.1080/24733938.2019.1609071",
language = "English",
journal = "Science and Medicine in Football",
issn = "2473-3938",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Application and interpretation of the yo-yo intermittent recovery test to the long-term physical development of girls association football players

AU - Wright, Matthew

AU - Innerd, Alison

PY - 2019/4/25

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N2 - We aimed examine yo-yo intermittent recovery test, level 1 (YYIRL1) performance in girls football players. Mixed-linear modelling was used to determine within-season changes in YYIRL1 performance and between and within- player variation over four years, at four time points (July, September, December and May) in 86 players (474 observations). Twenty-three players, tested over three consecutive years were retained for further analysis. Magnitude-based inferences were used to quantify annual change in performance on a group and individual level. Within player correlations were used to determine the association between YYIRL1 and maturation. ‘Very likely’ small (14, ±90% confidence interval 8.1 – 20%) improvements were observed between July and Septemberand ‘possibly’ trivial (5.5, 0.41 to 11%) differences between September and May. Within-player variation throughout the in-season period, representing the typical error of the estimate was 23%, 22 – 25% and between-player, 38, 33 – 44%. We observed ‘most likely’ moderate improvements (32, 17 to 49%) over three years that were moderately associated with changes in maturation (r = 0.46, 0.13 to 0.70). A minimum change of ≥44% is required to detect ‘likely’ improvements in YYIRL1 performance on an individual basis. Girls football players appear responsive to pre-season training and to long-term exposure to systematic training.

AB - We aimed examine yo-yo intermittent recovery test, level 1 (YYIRL1) performance in girls football players. Mixed-linear modelling was used to determine within-season changes in YYIRL1 performance and between and within- player variation over four years, at four time points (July, September, December and May) in 86 players (474 observations). Twenty-three players, tested over three consecutive years were retained for further analysis. Magnitude-based inferences were used to quantify annual change in performance on a group and individual level. Within player correlations were used to determine the association between YYIRL1 and maturation. ‘Very likely’ small (14, ±90% confidence interval 8.1 – 20%) improvements were observed between July and Septemberand ‘possibly’ trivial (5.5, 0.41 to 11%) differences between September and May. Within-player variation throughout the in-season period, representing the typical error of the estimate was 23%, 22 – 25% and between-player, 38, 33 – 44%. We observed ‘most likely’ moderate improvements (32, 17 to 49%) over three years that were moderately associated with changes in maturation (r = 0.46, 0.13 to 0.70). A minimum change of ≥44% is required to detect ‘likely’ improvements in YYIRL1 performance on an individual basis. Girls football players appear responsive to pre-season training and to long-term exposure to systematic training.

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JO - Science and Medicine in Football

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