Brief intervention to prevent hazardous drinking in young people aged 14-15 in a high school setting (SIPS JR-HIGH): Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

Stephanie O'Neil, Simon Coulton, Paolo Deluca, Mark Deverill, Colin Drummond, Eilish Gilvarry, Erin Graybill, Christine Harle, Denise Howel, Eileen Kaner, Paul McArdle, Elaine McColl, Ruth McGovern, Chris Speed, Elaine Stamp, Les Tate, Dorothy Newbury-Birch

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    Abstract

    Background: Whilst the overall proportion of young people drinking alcohol in the United Kingdom has decreased in recent years, those who do drink appear to drink a larger amount, and more frequently. Early and heavy drinking by younger adolescents is a significant public health problem linked to intellectual impairment, increased risk of injuries, mental health issues, unprotected or regretted sexual experience, violence, and sometimes accidental death, which leads to high social and economic costs. This feasibility pilot trial aims to explore the feasibility of delivering brief alcohol intervention in a school setting with adolescents aged 14 and 15 and to examine the acceptability of study measures to school staff, young people and parents.Methods and design: Seven schools across one geographical area in the North East of England will be recruited. Schools will be randomly allocated to one of three conditions: provision of an advice leaflet (control condition, n = 2 schools); a 30-minute brief interactive session, which combines structured advice and motivational interviewing techniques delivered by the school learning mentor (level 1 condition, n = 2 schools); and a 60-minute session involving family members delivered by the school learning mentor (level 2 condition, n = 3 schools). Participants will be year 10 school pupils (aged 14 and 15) who screen positively on a single alcohol screening question and who consent to take part in the trial. Year 10 pupils in all seven schools will be followed up at 6 and 12 months. Secondary outcome measures include the ten-question Alcohol-Use Disorders Identification Test. The EQ-5D-Y and a modified short service use questionnaire will inform the health and social resource costs for any future economic evaluation.Young people recruited into the trial will also complete a 28-day timeline follow back questionnaire at 12-month follow-up. A qualitative evaluation (with young people, school staff, learning mentors, and parents) will examine facilitators and barriers to the use of screening and brief intervention approaches in the school setting in this age group.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number166
    JournalTrials
    Volume13
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 13 Sep 2012

    Fingerprint

    Drinking
    Randomized Controlled Trials
    Mentors
    Alcohols
    Learning
    Pupil
    Parents
    Motivational Interviewing
    Costs and Cost Analysis
    Health Resources
    Sex Offenses
    Alcohol Drinking
    England
    Cost-Benefit Analysis
    Mental Health
    Public Health
    Age Groups
    Economics
    Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

    Cite this

    O'Neil, Stephanie ; Coulton, Simon ; Deluca, Paolo ; Deverill, Mark ; Drummond, Colin ; Gilvarry, Eilish ; Graybill, Erin ; Harle, Christine ; Howel, Denise ; Kaner, Eileen ; McArdle, Paul ; McColl, Elaine ; McGovern, Ruth ; Speed, Chris ; Stamp, Elaine ; Tate, Les ; Newbury-Birch, Dorothy. / Brief intervention to prevent hazardous drinking in young people aged 14-15 in a high school setting (SIPS JR-HIGH) : Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. In: Trials. 2012 ; Vol. 13.
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    abstract = "Background: Whilst the overall proportion of young people drinking alcohol in the United Kingdom has decreased in recent years, those who do drink appear to drink a larger amount, and more frequently. Early and heavy drinking by younger adolescents is a significant public health problem linked to intellectual impairment, increased risk of injuries, mental health issues, unprotected or regretted sexual experience, violence, and sometimes accidental death, which leads to high social and economic costs. This feasibility pilot trial aims to explore the feasibility of delivering brief alcohol intervention in a school setting with adolescents aged 14 and 15 and to examine the acceptability of study measures to school staff, young people and parents.Methods and design: Seven schools across one geographical area in the North East of England will be recruited. Schools will be randomly allocated to one of three conditions: provision of an advice leaflet (control condition, n = 2 schools); a 30-minute brief interactive session, which combines structured advice and motivational interviewing techniques delivered by the school learning mentor (level 1 condition, n = 2 schools); and a 60-minute session involving family members delivered by the school learning mentor (level 2 condition, n = 3 schools). Participants will be year 10 school pupils (aged 14 and 15) who screen positively on a single alcohol screening question and who consent to take part in the trial. Year 10 pupils in all seven schools will be followed up at 6 and 12 months. Secondary outcome measures include the ten-question Alcohol-Use Disorders Identification Test. The EQ-5D-Y and a modified short service use questionnaire will inform the health and social resource costs for any future economic evaluation.Young people recruited into the trial will also complete a 28-day timeline follow back questionnaire at 12-month follow-up. A qualitative evaluation (with young people, school staff, learning mentors, and parents) will examine facilitators and barriers to the use of screening and brief intervention approaches in the school setting in this age group.",
    author = "Stephanie O'Neil and Simon Coulton and Paolo Deluca and Mark Deverill and Colin Drummond and Eilish Gilvarry and Erin Graybill and Christine Harle and Denise Howel and Eileen Kaner and Paul McArdle and Elaine McColl and Ruth McGovern and Chris Speed and Elaine Stamp and Les Tate and Dorothy Newbury-Birch",
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    O'Neil, S, Coulton, S, Deluca, P, Deverill, M, Drummond, C, Gilvarry, E, Graybill, E, Harle, C, Howel, D, Kaner, E, McArdle, P, McColl, E, McGovern, R, Speed, C, Stamp, E, Tate, L & Newbury-Birch, D 2012, 'Brief intervention to prevent hazardous drinking in young people aged 14-15 in a high school setting (SIPS JR-HIGH): Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial', Trials, vol. 13, 166. https://doi.org/10.1186/1745-6215-13-166

    Brief intervention to prevent hazardous drinking in young people aged 14-15 in a high school setting (SIPS JR-HIGH) : Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. / O'Neil, Stephanie; Coulton, Simon; Deluca, Paolo; Deverill, Mark; Drummond, Colin; Gilvarry, Eilish; Graybill, Erin; Harle, Christine; Howel, Denise; Kaner, Eileen; McArdle, Paul; McColl, Elaine; McGovern, Ruth; Speed, Chris; Stamp, Elaine; Tate, Les; Newbury-Birch, Dorothy.

    In: Trials, Vol. 13, 166, 13.09.2012.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    T1 - Brief intervention to prevent hazardous drinking in young people aged 14-15 in a high school setting (SIPS JR-HIGH)

    T2 - Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    AU - O'Neil, Stephanie

    AU - Coulton, Simon

    AU - Deluca, Paolo

    AU - Deverill, Mark

    AU - Drummond, Colin

    AU - Gilvarry, Eilish

    AU - Graybill, Erin

    AU - Harle, Christine

    AU - Howel, Denise

    AU - Kaner, Eileen

    AU - McArdle, Paul

    AU - McColl, Elaine

    AU - McGovern, Ruth

    AU - Speed, Chris

    AU - Stamp, Elaine

    AU - Tate, Les

    AU - Newbury-Birch, Dorothy

    PY - 2012/9/13

    Y1 - 2012/9/13

    N2 - Background: Whilst the overall proportion of young people drinking alcohol in the United Kingdom has decreased in recent years, those who do drink appear to drink a larger amount, and more frequently. Early and heavy drinking by younger adolescents is a significant public health problem linked to intellectual impairment, increased risk of injuries, mental health issues, unprotected or regretted sexual experience, violence, and sometimes accidental death, which leads to high social and economic costs. This feasibility pilot trial aims to explore the feasibility of delivering brief alcohol intervention in a school setting with adolescents aged 14 and 15 and to examine the acceptability of study measures to school staff, young people and parents.Methods and design: Seven schools across one geographical area in the North East of England will be recruited. Schools will be randomly allocated to one of three conditions: provision of an advice leaflet (control condition, n = 2 schools); a 30-minute brief interactive session, which combines structured advice and motivational interviewing techniques delivered by the school learning mentor (level 1 condition, n = 2 schools); and a 60-minute session involving family members delivered by the school learning mentor (level 2 condition, n = 3 schools). Participants will be year 10 school pupils (aged 14 and 15) who screen positively on a single alcohol screening question and who consent to take part in the trial. Year 10 pupils in all seven schools will be followed up at 6 and 12 months. Secondary outcome measures include the ten-question Alcohol-Use Disorders Identification Test. The EQ-5D-Y and a modified short service use questionnaire will inform the health and social resource costs for any future economic evaluation.Young people recruited into the trial will also complete a 28-day timeline follow back questionnaire at 12-month follow-up. A qualitative evaluation (with young people, school staff, learning mentors, and parents) will examine facilitators and barriers to the use of screening and brief intervention approaches in the school setting in this age group.

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