‘Co-production evaluation of an Exercise Referral Scheme (ERS) for adults with existing health conditions’

Grant McGeechan, Dawn Phillips, Gillian O’Neill, Dorothy Newbury-Birch

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterpeer-review

Abstract

Title: Co-production evaluation of an Exercise Referral Scheme for adults with existing health conditions (in association with FUSE).
Background (250): Physical activity should be seen as a clinical need which can improve physical and mental health and is associated with a reduced risk of over 20 health conditions. Even a small increase in activity can improve health and the greatest benefits are seen in those who were previously inactive
Aims (250): The primary aim was to Increase participation in physical activity and support individuals to sustain healthy lifestyle changes for a cohort of people with existing health conditions who were participating in less than 30 minutes of activity per week.
Methods (463): A mixture of survey data and anthropometric measures were used for this evaluation. At baseline participants are measured on their weight, waist circumference and have their BMI calculated. These measures are repeated at their exit review, and at 6-month follow up to assess the impact of the service on these factors over time. Participants were also asked to self-report their levels of physical activity using the 7-day recall tool at these three time points to assess what impact the service had on their engagement in physical activity over time
Results (600): Participants who completed the 12-week programme were significantly more likely to have become physically active than to have remained inactive. At 6-month follow up participants were still more likely to be physically active than inactive.
Significant reductions in waist circumference and BMI were observed when comparing baseline with exit review. Furthermore a significant increase in physical activity was observed when comparing baseline with exit review, and baseline with 6-month follow up.
Conclusions (574): The results of this evaluation indicate that when working with clients who are ready to change their behaviour; positive results can be achieved and sustained up to 6 months later. Increased waist circumference is associated with risk of type 2 diabetes, therefore any reduction in waist circumference can reduce this risk. Furthermore, increasing physical activity is associated with reduced risk of over 20 health conditions with even a small increase capable of reducing risk. This service has demonstrated a positive impact on waist circumference and engagement in physical activity.
Expected Learning Outcomes (342): NICE guidelines recommend that ERS should only be used in the management of existing health conditions, but should not be used solely for the purpose of increasing physical activity. The results of this evaluation have highlighted that such schemes can Increase participation in physical activity for those with existing health conditions and support individuals to sustain healthy lifestyle changes.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 6 Dec 2015
EventFaculty of Public Health Annual Conference 2015 - Sage, Gateshead, United Kingdom
Duration: 23 Jun 201524 Jun 2015

Conference

ConferenceFaculty of Public Health Annual Conference 2015
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityGateshead
Period23/06/1524/06/15

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