Considerations for peer research and implications for mental health professionals: learning from research on food insecurity and severe mental illness

Grant McGeechan, Hannah Moore, Nikita LeSavuage, Jo Smith, Emma Giles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Abstract

What is known on the subject
Peer research methodologies and methods are increasingly used in research, particularly to benefit from lived experiences.
The experiences of peer researchers with severe mental illness are less common, including the impact on them of conducting peer-led research.
What the paper adds to existing knowledge
This paper shares the experience of peer research and suggests in the context of food insecurity, that it is not well understood by some healthcare professionals.
What are the implications for practice
Implications include considerations around trauma-informed care and the need for screening for food insecurity in mental healthcare settings. Research implications include providing training for peer research and needing to consider longevity of peer researcher relationships.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Mar 2024

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