Cultural criminology and primitive accumulation: A formal introduction for two strangers who should really become more intimate

Steve Hall, Simon Winlow

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    In this brief polemic we argue that a renewed critical approach to the destructive power of capitalism is essential for criminological theory. The current focus on the allegedly plural and transgressive sub-cultural foreground of criminality has drawn our attention away from the restrictive and constitutive politico-cultural power that the mutating ‘deep structure’ of capitalism wields over contemporary social life. Rather than delve into the hapless post-political worlds of inter-subjectivity, relativism and micro-exotica in the expectation of finding organic forms of ‘resistance’, yield ground to cynical actuarialism and retreat from serious critical reasoning, 21st-century criminology must take a step forward in addressing the increasingly competitive, anxious and criminogenic culture of advanced capitalism as it enters a revived and notably brutal phase of primitive accumulation. It can do this by tightening its empirical focus, strengthening its theoretical approach and deepening its philosophical foundations.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)82-90
    JournalCrime, Media, Culture
    Volume3
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2007

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