Developing Collaborative and Sustainable Networks of Social Support: Community Chaplaincy, Faith Communities and the Successful Reintegration of Ex-Prisoners.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Despite an almost unprecedented resurgence of political interest in the successful resettlement of those released from custody (Burnett and Maruna 2006), there continues to exist a plethora of unresolved physical and emotional obstacles which effectively serve to militate against the successful desistance of many ex-prisoners attempting to return to the communities from which they came (Lewis et al 2007). Endeavouring to ameliorate the precarious and potentially destructive milieu into which many ex-prisoners are released, the theologically inspired and value driven Community Chaplaincy projects operating throughout England and Wales and Northern Ireland provide unconditional practical and spiritual support to those exiting custodial institutions in an attempt to improve their life chances and ultimately reduce recidivism. In light of the evidential importance of the perpetual sustainability of such projects, this article has sought to explore both the extent to which local faith communities and faith-based organisations are supporting the efforts of individual Community Chaplaincy projects and whether there exists the potential scope to develop further such collaborative partnerships in order to ensure that sustainable networks of social support continue to be available to those returning from the confines of various custodial institutions throughout England and Wales and Northern Ireland
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)3-13
    Number of pages10
    JournalInternational Journal of Community Chaplaincy
    Volume2
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

    Fingerprint

    reintegration
    prisoner
    faith
    social support
    community
    political interest
    resettlement
    child custody
    sustainability
    Values

    Cite this

    @article{51361a09e43c4468a10bafc42619d17a,
    title = "Developing Collaborative and Sustainable Networks of Social Support: Community Chaplaincy, Faith Communities and the Successful Reintegration of Ex-Prisoners.",
    abstract = "Despite an almost unprecedented resurgence of political interest in the successful resettlement of those released from custody (Burnett and Maruna 2006), there continues to exist a plethora of unresolved physical and emotional obstacles which effectively serve to militate against the successful desistance of many ex-prisoners attempting to return to the communities from which they came (Lewis et al 2007). Endeavouring to ameliorate the precarious and potentially destructive milieu into which many ex-prisoners are released, the theologically inspired and value driven Community Chaplaincy projects operating throughout England and Wales and Northern Ireland provide unconditional practical and spiritual support to those exiting custodial institutions in an attempt to improve their life chances and ultimately reduce recidivism. In light of the evidential importance of the perpetual sustainability of such projects, this article has sought to explore both the extent to which local faith communities and faith-based organisations are supporting the efforts of individual Community Chaplaincy projects and whether there exists the potential scope to develop further such collaborative partnerships in order to ensure that sustainable networks of social support continue to be available to those returning from the confines of various custodial institutions throughout England and Wales and Northern Ireland",
    author = "Justin Kotze",
    year = "2013",
    language = "English",
    volume = "2",
    pages = "3--13",
    journal = "International Journal of Community Chaplaincy",
    number = "1",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Developing Collaborative and Sustainable Networks of Social Support

    T2 - Community Chaplaincy, Faith Communities and the Successful Reintegration of Ex-Prisoners.

    AU - Kotze, Justin

    PY - 2013

    Y1 - 2013

    N2 - Despite an almost unprecedented resurgence of political interest in the successful resettlement of those released from custody (Burnett and Maruna 2006), there continues to exist a plethora of unresolved physical and emotional obstacles which effectively serve to militate against the successful desistance of many ex-prisoners attempting to return to the communities from which they came (Lewis et al 2007). Endeavouring to ameliorate the precarious and potentially destructive milieu into which many ex-prisoners are released, the theologically inspired and value driven Community Chaplaincy projects operating throughout England and Wales and Northern Ireland provide unconditional practical and spiritual support to those exiting custodial institutions in an attempt to improve their life chances and ultimately reduce recidivism. In light of the evidential importance of the perpetual sustainability of such projects, this article has sought to explore both the extent to which local faith communities and faith-based organisations are supporting the efforts of individual Community Chaplaincy projects and whether there exists the potential scope to develop further such collaborative partnerships in order to ensure that sustainable networks of social support continue to be available to those returning from the confines of various custodial institutions throughout England and Wales and Northern Ireland

    AB - Despite an almost unprecedented resurgence of political interest in the successful resettlement of those released from custody (Burnett and Maruna 2006), there continues to exist a plethora of unresolved physical and emotional obstacles which effectively serve to militate against the successful desistance of many ex-prisoners attempting to return to the communities from which they came (Lewis et al 2007). Endeavouring to ameliorate the precarious and potentially destructive milieu into which many ex-prisoners are released, the theologically inspired and value driven Community Chaplaincy projects operating throughout England and Wales and Northern Ireland provide unconditional practical and spiritual support to those exiting custodial institutions in an attempt to improve their life chances and ultimately reduce recidivism. In light of the evidential importance of the perpetual sustainability of such projects, this article has sought to explore both the extent to which local faith communities and faith-based organisations are supporting the efforts of individual Community Chaplaincy projects and whether there exists the potential scope to develop further such collaborative partnerships in order to ensure that sustainable networks of social support continue to be available to those returning from the confines of various custodial institutions throughout England and Wales and Northern Ireland

    M3 - Article

    VL - 2

    SP - 3

    EP - 13

    JO - International Journal of Community Chaplaincy

    JF - International Journal of Community Chaplaincy

    IS - 1

    ER -