Effect of altitude on urinary, plasma and nail fluoride levels in children and adults in Nepal

Om Sah, Anne Maguire, Vida Zohoori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction A greater prevalence of dental fluorosis has been reported in higher- versus lower-altitude communities. This study, for the first time, examined several aspects of fluoride metabolism in children, aged 4–5 years, and their parent, living at lower altitude (<78 m) and higher altitude (>1487) areas in Nepal.MethodsThe study assessed total daily fluoride intake (TDFI), 24 h urinary fluoride excretion (UFE), and fluoride concentrations of toe- and finger-nail (FCtoenail, FCfingernail) in children and parents as well as fluoride concentration of plasma (FCplasma) in parents. Fractional urinary fluoride excretion (FUFE) was calculated as the ratio between UFE and TDFI. FCtoenail, FCfingernail and FCplasma were normalised for TDFI by dividing the variables by TDFI and the ratio was reported as the percentage.ResultsIn total, 89 children and 80 parents took part in the study: 42 children and 41 parents from the lower altitude area; 47 children and 39 parents from the higher altitude area. Fluoride concentration of drinking water was significantly (P < 0.001) higher at lower altitude (0.395 mg F/l) than at higher altitude (0.104 mg F/l). TDFI was significantly (p < 0.001) higher in both children and parents living in lower altitude than those living at higher altitude.There was a statistically significant (p = 0.044) difference in the mean FUFE of children living at lower altitude (53%) and higher altitude (46%). However, no significant difference in FUFE was found between parents living at lower altitude (47%) compared with higher altitude (41%).In both children and parents, no statistically significant differences in normalised FCtoenail, FCfingernail were found between the two altitude areas. However, normalised FCplasma was statistically significantly (P = 0.005) higher in parents living at higher altitude (0.15%) compared with those living at lower altitude (0.11%).ConclusionThe results suggest that higher altitude living results in decreased urinary fluoride excretion, and consequently increased fluoride retention in children for a given dose (amount) of fluoride.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology
Volume57
Early online date11 Sep 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Jan 2020

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Nails
Nepal
Fluorides
Plasmas
Parents
Dental Fluorosis

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title = "Effect of altitude on urinary, plasma and nail fluoride levels in children and adults in Nepal",
abstract = "Introduction A greater prevalence of dental fluorosis has been reported in higher- versus lower-altitude communities. This study, for the first time, examined several aspects of fluoride metabolism in children, aged 4–5 years, and their parent, living at lower altitude (<78 m) and higher altitude (>1487) areas in Nepal.MethodsThe study assessed total daily fluoride intake (TDFI), 24 h urinary fluoride excretion (UFE), and fluoride concentrations of toe- and finger-nail (FCtoenail, FCfingernail) in children and parents as well as fluoride concentration of plasma (FCplasma) in parents. Fractional urinary fluoride excretion (FUFE) was calculated as the ratio between UFE and TDFI. FCtoenail, FCfingernail and FCplasma were normalised for TDFI by dividing the variables by TDFI and the ratio was reported as the percentage.ResultsIn total, 89 children and 80 parents took part in the study: 42 children and 41 parents from the lower altitude area; 47 children and 39 parents from the higher altitude area. Fluoride concentration of drinking water was significantly (P < 0.001) higher at lower altitude (0.395 mg F/l) than at higher altitude (0.104 mg F/l). TDFI was significantly (p < 0.001) higher in both children and parents living in lower altitude than those living at higher altitude.There was a statistically significant (p = 0.044) difference in the mean FUFE of children living at lower altitude (53{\%}) and higher altitude (46{\%}). However, no significant difference in FUFE was found between parents living at lower altitude (47{\%}) compared with higher altitude (41{\%}).In both children and parents, no statistically significant differences in normalised FCtoenail, FCfingernail were found between the two altitude areas. However, normalised FCplasma was statistically significantly (P = 0.005) higher in parents living at higher altitude (0.15{\%}) compared with those living at lower altitude (0.11{\%}).ConclusionThe results suggest that higher altitude living results in decreased urinary fluoride excretion, and consequently increased fluoride retention in children for a given dose (amount) of fluoride.",
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Effect of altitude on urinary, plasma and nail fluoride levels in children and adults in Nepal. / Sah, Om; Maguire, Anne; Zohoori, Vida.

In: Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology, Vol. 57, 31.01.2020, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of altitude on urinary, plasma and nail fluoride levels in children and adults in Nepal

AU - Sah, Om

AU - Maguire, Anne

AU - Zohoori, Vida

PY - 2020/1/31

Y1 - 2020/1/31

N2 - Introduction A greater prevalence of dental fluorosis has been reported in higher- versus lower-altitude communities. This study, for the first time, examined several aspects of fluoride metabolism in children, aged 4–5 years, and their parent, living at lower altitude (<78 m) and higher altitude (>1487) areas in Nepal.MethodsThe study assessed total daily fluoride intake (TDFI), 24 h urinary fluoride excretion (UFE), and fluoride concentrations of toe- and finger-nail (FCtoenail, FCfingernail) in children and parents as well as fluoride concentration of plasma (FCplasma) in parents. Fractional urinary fluoride excretion (FUFE) was calculated as the ratio between UFE and TDFI. FCtoenail, FCfingernail and FCplasma were normalised for TDFI by dividing the variables by TDFI and the ratio was reported as the percentage.ResultsIn total, 89 children and 80 parents took part in the study: 42 children and 41 parents from the lower altitude area; 47 children and 39 parents from the higher altitude area. Fluoride concentration of drinking water was significantly (P < 0.001) higher at lower altitude (0.395 mg F/l) than at higher altitude (0.104 mg F/l). TDFI was significantly (p < 0.001) higher in both children and parents living in lower altitude than those living at higher altitude.There was a statistically significant (p = 0.044) difference in the mean FUFE of children living at lower altitude (53%) and higher altitude (46%). However, no significant difference in FUFE was found between parents living at lower altitude (47%) compared with higher altitude (41%).In both children and parents, no statistically significant differences in normalised FCtoenail, FCfingernail were found between the two altitude areas. However, normalised FCplasma was statistically significantly (P = 0.005) higher in parents living at higher altitude (0.15%) compared with those living at lower altitude (0.11%).ConclusionThe results suggest that higher altitude living results in decreased urinary fluoride excretion, and consequently increased fluoride retention in children for a given dose (amount) of fluoride.

AB - Introduction A greater prevalence of dental fluorosis has been reported in higher- versus lower-altitude communities. This study, for the first time, examined several aspects of fluoride metabolism in children, aged 4–5 years, and their parent, living at lower altitude (<78 m) and higher altitude (>1487) areas in Nepal.MethodsThe study assessed total daily fluoride intake (TDFI), 24 h urinary fluoride excretion (UFE), and fluoride concentrations of toe- and finger-nail (FCtoenail, FCfingernail) in children and parents as well as fluoride concentration of plasma (FCplasma) in parents. Fractional urinary fluoride excretion (FUFE) was calculated as the ratio between UFE and TDFI. FCtoenail, FCfingernail and FCplasma were normalised for TDFI by dividing the variables by TDFI and the ratio was reported as the percentage.ResultsIn total, 89 children and 80 parents took part in the study: 42 children and 41 parents from the lower altitude area; 47 children and 39 parents from the higher altitude area. Fluoride concentration of drinking water was significantly (P < 0.001) higher at lower altitude (0.395 mg F/l) than at higher altitude (0.104 mg F/l). TDFI was significantly (p < 0.001) higher in both children and parents living in lower altitude than those living at higher altitude.There was a statistically significant (p = 0.044) difference in the mean FUFE of children living at lower altitude (53%) and higher altitude (46%). However, no significant difference in FUFE was found between parents living at lower altitude (47%) compared with higher altitude (41%).In both children and parents, no statistically significant differences in normalised FCtoenail, FCfingernail were found between the two altitude areas. However, normalised FCplasma was statistically significantly (P = 0.005) higher in parents living at higher altitude (0.15%) compared with those living at lower altitude (0.11%).ConclusionThe results suggest that higher altitude living results in decreased urinary fluoride excretion, and consequently increased fluoride retention in children for a given dose (amount) of fluoride.

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