Effects of Electric Stimulation on C and A Delta Fiber-Mediated Thermal Perception Thresholds

Shea T. Palmer, Denis J. Martin, Wilma M. Steedman, John Ravey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine if interferential current (IFC) or transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) alters C and A delta fiber-mediated thermal perception thresholds. Design: Single-blind, randomized controlled trial. Setting: Laboratory. Participants: One hundred forty healthy women volunteers (mean age ± standard deviation, 20.6±2.7y). Interventions: Subjects were randomly and exclusively assigned to 1 of 7 groups (n=20 in each): 0, 5, and 100Hz of IFC; 5 and 100Hz of TENS; placebo and control stimulation. Stimulation was applied through 2 electrodes placed over the median nerve. Warm sensation, cold sensation, hot pain, and cold pain perception thresholds were measured from the thenar eminence by using a quantitative sensory testing device and a method of limits algorithm. Main Outcome Measures: Warm sensation, cold sensation, hot pain, and cold pain thresholds (°C) before, during, and after stimulation. Results: There was a statistically significant effect of time for all 4 thermal perception thresholds (separate 2-way analyses of variance with repeated measures, all P<.001). There were no statistically significant differences between experimental groups, nor any interaction effects (all P>.05). Conclusions: Neither IFC nor TENS altered C and A delta fiber-mediated thermal perception thresholds. The results suggest that any analgesic mechanisms with these modalities are likely to be complex.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)119-128
Number of pages10
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume85
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2004

Fingerprint

Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation
Electric Stimulation
Hot Temperature
Pain Threshold
Pain
Pain Perception
Median Nerve
Analgesics
Analysis of Variance
Healthy Volunteers
Electrodes
Randomized Controlled Trials
Placebos
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Equipment and Supplies

Cite this

@article{29b67506f6bf42d0bb58347f4180a5c0,
title = "Effects of Electric Stimulation on C and A Delta Fiber-Mediated Thermal Perception Thresholds",
abstract = "Objective: To determine if interferential current (IFC) or transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) alters C and A delta fiber-mediated thermal perception thresholds. Design: Single-blind, randomized controlled trial. Setting: Laboratory. Participants: One hundred forty healthy women volunteers (mean age ± standard deviation, 20.6±2.7y). Interventions: Subjects were randomly and exclusively assigned to 1 of 7 groups (n=20 in each): 0, 5, and 100Hz of IFC; 5 and 100Hz of TENS; placebo and control stimulation. Stimulation was applied through 2 electrodes placed over the median nerve. Warm sensation, cold sensation, hot pain, and cold pain perception thresholds were measured from the thenar eminence by using a quantitative sensory testing device and a method of limits algorithm. Main Outcome Measures: Warm sensation, cold sensation, hot pain, and cold pain thresholds (°C) before, during, and after stimulation. Results: There was a statistically significant effect of time for all 4 thermal perception thresholds (separate 2-way analyses of variance with repeated measures, all P<.001). There were no statistically significant differences between experimental groups, nor any interaction effects (all P>.05). Conclusions: Neither IFC nor TENS altered C and A delta fiber-mediated thermal perception thresholds. The results suggest that any analgesic mechanisms with these modalities are likely to be complex.",
author = "Palmer, {Shea T.} and Martin, {Denis J.} and Steedman, {Wilma M.} and John Ravey",
year = "2004",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0003-9993(03)00432-5",
language = "English",
volume = "85",
pages = "119--128",
journal = "Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation",
issn = "0003-9993",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "1",

}

Effects of Electric Stimulation on C and A Delta Fiber-Mediated Thermal Perception Thresholds. / Palmer, Shea T.; Martin, Denis J.; Steedman, Wilma M.; Ravey, John.

In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vol. 85, No. 1, 01.01.2004, p. 119-128.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of Electric Stimulation on C and A Delta Fiber-Mediated Thermal Perception Thresholds

AU - Palmer, Shea T.

AU - Martin, Denis J.

AU - Steedman, Wilma M.

AU - Ravey, John

PY - 2004/1/1

Y1 - 2004/1/1

N2 - Objective: To determine if interferential current (IFC) or transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) alters C and A delta fiber-mediated thermal perception thresholds. Design: Single-blind, randomized controlled trial. Setting: Laboratory. Participants: One hundred forty healthy women volunteers (mean age ± standard deviation, 20.6±2.7y). Interventions: Subjects were randomly and exclusively assigned to 1 of 7 groups (n=20 in each): 0, 5, and 100Hz of IFC; 5 and 100Hz of TENS; placebo and control stimulation. Stimulation was applied through 2 electrodes placed over the median nerve. Warm sensation, cold sensation, hot pain, and cold pain perception thresholds were measured from the thenar eminence by using a quantitative sensory testing device and a method of limits algorithm. Main Outcome Measures: Warm sensation, cold sensation, hot pain, and cold pain thresholds (°C) before, during, and after stimulation. Results: There was a statistically significant effect of time for all 4 thermal perception thresholds (separate 2-way analyses of variance with repeated measures, all P<.001). There were no statistically significant differences between experimental groups, nor any interaction effects (all P>.05). Conclusions: Neither IFC nor TENS altered C and A delta fiber-mediated thermal perception thresholds. The results suggest that any analgesic mechanisms with these modalities are likely to be complex.

AB - Objective: To determine if interferential current (IFC) or transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) alters C and A delta fiber-mediated thermal perception thresholds. Design: Single-blind, randomized controlled trial. Setting: Laboratory. Participants: One hundred forty healthy women volunteers (mean age ± standard deviation, 20.6±2.7y). Interventions: Subjects were randomly and exclusively assigned to 1 of 7 groups (n=20 in each): 0, 5, and 100Hz of IFC; 5 and 100Hz of TENS; placebo and control stimulation. Stimulation was applied through 2 electrodes placed over the median nerve. Warm sensation, cold sensation, hot pain, and cold pain perception thresholds were measured from the thenar eminence by using a quantitative sensory testing device and a method of limits algorithm. Main Outcome Measures: Warm sensation, cold sensation, hot pain, and cold pain thresholds (°C) before, during, and after stimulation. Results: There was a statistically significant effect of time for all 4 thermal perception thresholds (separate 2-way analyses of variance with repeated measures, all P<.001). There were no statistically significant differences between experimental groups, nor any interaction effects (all P>.05). Conclusions: Neither IFC nor TENS altered C and A delta fiber-mediated thermal perception thresholds. The results suggest that any analgesic mechanisms with these modalities are likely to be complex.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0346728914&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0003-9993(03)00432-5

DO - 10.1016/S0003-9993(03)00432-5

M3 - Article

C2 - 14970979

AN - SCOPUS:0346728914

VL - 85

SP - 119

EP - 128

JO - Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

JF - Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

SN - 0003-9993

IS - 1

ER -