Effects of repeated bouts of soccer-specific intermittent exercise on salivary IgA

Vahid Sari-Sarraf, T. Reilly, D. Doran, G. Atkinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Failure to recover fully between sessions has been suggested to cause immunodepression. Therefore, the cumulative effects of soccer-specific intermittent exercise undertaken on different days 48 h apart on salivary IgA, cortisol and total protein concentration were investigated. Nine male subjects completed two trials of soccer-specific intermittent exercise 48 h apart on a motorised treadmill. Timed unstimulated saliva samples were collected immediately before and after exercise, and 24 and 48 h post-exercise. Salivary IgA concentration (EX1: 215 ±1 60 to 335 ± 246 and EX2: 144 ± 93 to 271 ± 185 mg·l-1, p = 0.007), osmolality (p = 0.001) and total protein (p = 0.001) increased immediately following exercise in both trials and decreased 24 h afterwards, whereas saliva flow rate decreased significantly (p = 0.015) before returning to pre-exercise values 24 h postexercise. The IgA secretion rate, IgA to osmolality ratio, IgA to total protein, solute secretion rate, total protein secretion rate, and cortisol did not differ between the time-points. The results suggest that performing two bouts of moderate intensity soccer-specific intermittent exercise 48 h apart does not suppress resting salivary IgA concentration significantly although a small progressive reduction in salivary IgA was observed. These findings may not extend to successive competitive soccer games when vulnerable players might experience clinically relevant reductions in s-IgA.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)366-371
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume29
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2008

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Soccer
Immunoglobulin A
Saliva
Osmolar Concentration
Hydrocortisone
Proteins
Immunosuppression

Cite this

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abstract = "Failure to recover fully between sessions has been suggested to cause immunodepression. Therefore, the cumulative effects of soccer-specific intermittent exercise undertaken on different days 48 h apart on salivary IgA, cortisol and total protein concentration were investigated. Nine male subjects completed two trials of soccer-specific intermittent exercise 48 h apart on a motorised treadmill. Timed unstimulated saliva samples were collected immediately before and after exercise, and 24 and 48 h post-exercise. Salivary IgA concentration (EX1: 215 ±1 60 to 335 ± 246 and EX2: 144 ± 93 to 271 ± 185 mg·l-1, p = 0.007), osmolality (p = 0.001) and total protein (p = 0.001) increased immediately following exercise in both trials and decreased 24 h afterwards, whereas saliva flow rate decreased significantly (p = 0.015) before returning to pre-exercise values 24 h postexercise. The IgA secretion rate, IgA to osmolality ratio, IgA to total protein, solute secretion rate, total protein secretion rate, and cortisol did not differ between the time-points. The results suggest that performing two bouts of moderate intensity soccer-specific intermittent exercise 48 h apart does not suppress resting salivary IgA concentration significantly although a small progressive reduction in salivary IgA was observed. These findings may not extend to successive competitive soccer games when vulnerable players might experience clinically relevant reductions in s-IgA.",
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Effects of repeated bouts of soccer-specific intermittent exercise on salivary IgA. / Sari-Sarraf, Vahid; Reilly, T.; Doran, D.; Atkinson, G.

In: International Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 29, No. 5, 01.05.2008, p. 366-371.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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