Exploration of efficient electron acceptors for organic solar cells: rational design of indacenodithiophene based non‐fullerene compounds

Muhammad Khalid, Muhammad Usman Khan, Eisha‑ tul ‑Razia, Zahid Shafiq, Mohammed Mujahid Alam, Muhammad Imran, Safwan Akram

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The global need for renewable sources of energy has compelled researchers to explore new sources and improve the efficiency of the existing technologies. Solar energy is considered to be one of the best options to resolve climate and energy crises because of its long‐term stability and pollution free energy production. Herein, we have synthesized a small acceptor compound (TPDR) and have utilized for rational designing of non‐fullerene chromophores (TPD1–TPD6) using end‐capped manipulation in A2–A1–D–A1–A2 configuration. The quantum chemical study (DFT/TD‐DFT) was used to characterize the effect of end group redistribution through frontier molecular orbital (FMO), optical absorption, reorganization energy, open circuit voltage (Voc), photovoltaic properties and intermolecular charge transfer for the designed compounds. FMO data exhibited that TPD5 had the least ΔE (1.71 eV) with highest maximum absorption (λmax) among all compounds due to the four cyano groups as the end‐ capped acceptor moieties. The reorganization energies of TPD1 TPD6 hinted at credible electron transportation due to the lower values of λe than λh. Furthermore, open circuit voltage (Voc) values showed similar amplitude for all compounds including parent chromophore, except TPD4 and TPD5 compounds. These designed compounds with unique end group acceptors have the potential to be used as novel fabrication materials for energy devices.
Original languageEnglish
JournalNature Scientific Reports
Early online date7 Oct 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Oct 2021

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