Food insecurity in adults with severe mental illness living in Northern England: A co-produced cross-sectional study

Jo Smith, Fatemeh Eskandari, Grant McGeechan, Scott Teasdale, Amelia Lake, Suzy Ker, Kevin Williamson, Alex Augustine, Nikita LeSavuage, Chris Lynch, Hannah Moore, Steph Scott, David Ekers, Vicki Whittaker, Jonathan Robinson, Emma Giles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This study aimed to explore food insecurity prevalence and experiences of adults with severe mental illness living in Northern England.

Methods
This mixed-methods cross-sectional study took place between March and October 2022. Participants were adults with self-reported severe mental illness living in Northern England. The survey included demographic, health, and financial questions. Food insecurity was measured using the US Department of Agriculture Adult Food Security measure. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics and binary logistic regression; and qualitative data using content analysis.

Results
In total, 135 participants completed the survey, with a mean age of 44.7 years (SD: 14.1, range: 18–75 years). Participants were predominantly male (53.3%), white (88%) and from Yorkshire (50.4%). The food insecurity prevalence was 50.4% (n = 68). There was statistical significance in food insecurity status by region (p = 0.001); impacts of severe mental illness on activities of daily living (p = 0.02); and the Covid pandemic on food access (p < 0.001). The North West had the highest prevalence of food insecurity (73.3%); followed by the Humber and North East regions (66.7%); and Yorkshire (33.8%). In multivariable binary logistic regression, severe mental illness' impact on daily living was the only predictive variable for food insecurity (odds ratio = 4.618, 95% confidence interval: 1.071–19.924, p = 0.04).

Conclusion
The prevalence of food insecurity in this study is higher than is reported in similar studies (41%). Mental health practitioners should routinely assess and monitor food insecurity in people living with severe mental illness. Further research should focus on food insecurity interventions in this population.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-14
JournalNutrition and Dietetics
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 Mar 2024

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Food insecurity in adults with severe mental illness living in Northern England: A co-produced cross-sectional study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this