Formation of a palladium-silicon interface by silane chemical vapor deposition on Pd(100)

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Abstract

The utility of chemical vapor deposition of silicon from silane gas as a potential route to interfaces has been investigated on Pd(100) using low-energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy. Initial adsorption at room temperature leads to the formation of amorphous palladium silicide/silicon surface layer. Annealing to 650 K after low silane exposure (< 5 L) results in subsurface diffusion of silicon with concomitant ejection of palladium atoms. Some surface silicide features also remain intact. Larger exposures (>5 L) at room temperature, followed by 650 K anneal, result in formation of a crystalline (Formula presented) silicide reconstruction. This palladium silicide phase is thought to be of (Formula presented) stoichiometry.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8443-8449
Number of pages7
JournalPhysical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics
Volume61
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2000

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Silanes
Palladium
Silicon
silanes
palladium
Chemical vapor deposition
vapor deposition
Low energy electron diffraction
Scanning tunneling microscopy
silicon
room temperature
Stoichiometry
scanning tunneling microscopy
stoichiometry
surface layers
electron diffraction
Gases
routes
Annealing
Crystalline materials

Cite this

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title = "Formation of a palladium-silicon interface by silane chemical vapor deposition on Pd(100)",
abstract = "The utility of chemical vapor deposition of silicon from silane gas as a potential route to interfaces has been investigated on Pd(100) using low-energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy. Initial adsorption at room temperature leads to the formation of amorphous palladium silicide/silicon surface layer. Annealing to 650 K after low silane exposure (< 5 L) results in subsurface diffusion of silicon with concomitant ejection of palladium atoms. Some surface silicide features also remain intact. Larger exposures (>5 L) at room temperature, followed by 650 K anneal, result in formation of a crystalline (Formula presented) silicide reconstruction. This palladium silicide phase is thought to be of (Formula presented) stoichiometry.",
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Formation of a palladium-silicon interface by silane chemical vapor deposition on Pd(100). / Ennis, Christopher; Spence, D.; Tear, S.

In: Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, Vol. 61, No. 12, 01.01.2000, p. 8443-8449.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Ennis, Christopher

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N2 - The utility of chemical vapor deposition of silicon from silane gas as a potential route to interfaces has been investigated on Pd(100) using low-energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy. Initial adsorption at room temperature leads to the formation of amorphous palladium silicide/silicon surface layer. Annealing to 650 K after low silane exposure (< 5 L) results in subsurface diffusion of silicon with concomitant ejection of palladium atoms. Some surface silicide features also remain intact. Larger exposures (>5 L) at room temperature, followed by 650 K anneal, result in formation of a crystalline (Formula presented) silicide reconstruction. This palladium silicide phase is thought to be of (Formula presented) stoichiometry.

AB - The utility of chemical vapor deposition of silicon from silane gas as a potential route to interfaces has been investigated on Pd(100) using low-energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy. Initial adsorption at room temperature leads to the formation of amorphous palladium silicide/silicon surface layer. Annealing to 650 K after low silane exposure (< 5 L) results in subsurface diffusion of silicon with concomitant ejection of palladium atoms. Some surface silicide features also remain intact. Larger exposures (>5 L) at room temperature, followed by 650 K anneal, result in formation of a crystalline (Formula presented) silicide reconstruction. This palladium silicide phase is thought to be of (Formula presented) stoichiometry.

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