From Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) to demonstrating demand response in blocks of buildings. Upgrading technical and social systems

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Abstract

Electricity networks base their stability on the balance between electricity usage and generation. Unbalance in the electricity network results in blackouts and can escalate to systems disruption at national and multinational level.
The National grids, Transmission Network Operators (TNOs) and Distribution Network Operators (DSOs) ensure the electricity grid remains within safe operational threshold. Demand Response (DR) is a series of the mechanisms
intended to procure that the electricity grid stays stable when a peak demand period is forecast. A demand response action aims at alleviating
grid stress or constrains making use of the flexibility that some users have on
their electricity use at specific periods. This flexibility is agreed through contracts between companies acting as aggregators and the National grid in the case of the UK for the current DR programs. These aggregators need to acquire flexibility from the qualified users (industry and large energy consumers mainly) in order to be able to manage the assets at disposal to response
to the grid’s requests to increase or the reduce energy consumption or
generation. The Demand Response as a means to balancing electricity grid stress over peak demand periods has long been a matter of research.
Currently DR is largely the reserve of large industrial consumers. It is now widely agreed that DR must become more attractive to smaller energy consumers
enabling the aggregation of the energy assets of those customers to increase the amount of flexibility available for DR.
This paper presents a detailed discussion of a pilot at a UK University campus of a DR energy management solution developed as part of the DR BoB EU project. This paper also highlights the need for complex social interactions within buildings to be integrated with the technical upgrades when implementing
DR solutions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages106
Number of pages8
Publication statusPublished - 2018
Event17th International Conference on Computing in Civil and Building Engineering - Tampere, Tampere, Finland
Duration: 5 Jun 20187 Jun 2018
https://www.ril.fi/en/events/icccbe-2018.html

Conference

Conference17th International Conference on Computing in Civil and Building Engineering
Abbreviated titleICCCBE 2018
CountryFinland
CityTampere
Period5/06/187/06/18
Internet address

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Electricity
Electric power transmission networks
Energy management
Electric power distribution
Industry
Energy utilization
Agglomeration

Cite this

Rodriguez, S., Crosbie, T., Dawood, M., Short, M., & Dawood, N. (2018). From Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) to demonstrating demand response in blocks of buildings. Upgrading technical and social systems. 106. Paper presented at 17th International Conference on Computing in Civil and Building Engineering, Tampere, Finland.
Rodriguez, Sergio ; Crosbie, Tracey ; Dawood, Muneeb ; Short, Michael ; Dawood, Nashwan. / From Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) to demonstrating demand response in blocks of buildings. Upgrading technical and social systems. Paper presented at 17th International Conference on Computing in Civil and Building Engineering, Tampere, Finland.8 p.
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abstract = "Electricity networks base their stability on the balance between electricity usage and generation. Unbalance in the electricity network results in blackouts and can escalate to systems disruption at national and multinational level. The National grids, Transmission Network Operators (TNOs) and Distribution Network Operators (DSOs) ensure the electricity grid remains within safe operational threshold. Demand Response (DR) is a series of the mechanisms intended to procure that the electricity grid stays stable when a peak demand period is forecast. A demand response action aims at alleviatinggrid stress or constrains making use of the flexibility that some users have on their electricity use at specific periods. This flexibility is agreed through contracts between companies acting as aggregators and the National grid in the case of the UK for the current DR programs. These aggregators need to acquire flexibility from the qualified users (industry and large energy consumers mainly) in order to be able to manage the assets at disposal to responseto the grid’s requests to increase or the reduce energy consumption or generation. The Demand Response as a means to balancing electricity grid stress over peak demand periods has long been a matter of research.Currently DR is largely the reserve of large industrial consumers. It is now widely agreed that DR must become more attractive to smaller energy consumers enabling the aggregation of the energy assets of those customers to increase the amount of flexibility available for DR. This paper presents a detailed discussion of a pilot at a UK University campus of a DR energy management solution developed as part of the DR BoB EU project. This paper also highlights the need for complex social interactions within buildings to be integrated with the technical upgrades when implementingDR solutions.",
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Rodriguez, S, Crosbie, T, Dawood, M, Short, M & Dawood, N 2018, 'From Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) to demonstrating demand response in blocks of buildings. Upgrading technical and social systems' Paper presented at 17th International Conference on Computing in Civil and Building Engineering, Tampere, Finland, 5/06/18 - 7/06/18, pp. 106.

From Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) to demonstrating demand response in blocks of buildings. Upgrading technical and social systems. / Rodriguez, Sergio; Crosbie, Tracey; Dawood, Muneeb; Short, Michael; Dawood, Nashwan.

2018. 106 Paper presented at 17th International Conference on Computing in Civil and Building Engineering, Tampere, Finland.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperResearchpeer-review

TY - CONF

T1 - From Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) to demonstrating demand response in blocks of buildings. Upgrading technical and social systems

AU - Rodriguez, Sergio

AU - Crosbie, Tracey

AU - Dawood, Muneeb

AU - Short, Michael

AU - Dawood, Nashwan

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Electricity networks base their stability on the balance between electricity usage and generation. Unbalance in the electricity network results in blackouts and can escalate to systems disruption at national and multinational level. The National grids, Transmission Network Operators (TNOs) and Distribution Network Operators (DSOs) ensure the electricity grid remains within safe operational threshold. Demand Response (DR) is a series of the mechanisms intended to procure that the electricity grid stays stable when a peak demand period is forecast. A demand response action aims at alleviatinggrid stress or constrains making use of the flexibility that some users have on their electricity use at specific periods. This flexibility is agreed through contracts between companies acting as aggregators and the National grid in the case of the UK for the current DR programs. These aggregators need to acquire flexibility from the qualified users (industry and large energy consumers mainly) in order to be able to manage the assets at disposal to responseto the grid’s requests to increase or the reduce energy consumption or generation. The Demand Response as a means to balancing electricity grid stress over peak demand periods has long been a matter of research.Currently DR is largely the reserve of large industrial consumers. It is now widely agreed that DR must become more attractive to smaller energy consumers enabling the aggregation of the energy assets of those customers to increase the amount of flexibility available for DR. This paper presents a detailed discussion of a pilot at a UK University campus of a DR energy management solution developed as part of the DR BoB EU project. This paper also highlights the need for complex social interactions within buildings to be integrated with the technical upgrades when implementingDR solutions.

AB - Electricity networks base their stability on the balance between electricity usage and generation. Unbalance in the electricity network results in blackouts and can escalate to systems disruption at national and multinational level. The National grids, Transmission Network Operators (TNOs) and Distribution Network Operators (DSOs) ensure the electricity grid remains within safe operational threshold. Demand Response (DR) is a series of the mechanisms intended to procure that the electricity grid stays stable when a peak demand period is forecast. A demand response action aims at alleviatinggrid stress or constrains making use of the flexibility that some users have on their electricity use at specific periods. This flexibility is agreed through contracts between companies acting as aggregators and the National grid in the case of the UK for the current DR programs. These aggregators need to acquire flexibility from the qualified users (industry and large energy consumers mainly) in order to be able to manage the assets at disposal to responseto the grid’s requests to increase or the reduce energy consumption or generation. The Demand Response as a means to balancing electricity grid stress over peak demand periods has long been a matter of research.Currently DR is largely the reserve of large industrial consumers. It is now widely agreed that DR must become more attractive to smaller energy consumers enabling the aggregation of the energy assets of those customers to increase the amount of flexibility available for DR. This paper presents a detailed discussion of a pilot at a UK University campus of a DR energy management solution developed as part of the DR BoB EU project. This paper also highlights the need for complex social interactions within buildings to be integrated with the technical upgrades when implementingDR solutions.

M3 - Paper

SP - 106

ER -

Rodriguez S, Crosbie T, Dawood M, Short M, Dawood N. From Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) to demonstrating demand response in blocks of buildings. Upgrading technical and social systems. 2018. Paper presented at 17th International Conference on Computing in Civil and Building Engineering, Tampere, Finland.