Good Vibrations: How mentorship can deepen University learning and how dance can begin to answer the primary social and psychological needs of people living with dementia

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Abstract

‘Good Vibrations’ is a pilot project designed to deliver dance classes to people living with dementia and it is supported by Tees Valley Dance and Age UK Darlington. The project was devised by myself with the assistance of two Teesside University undergraduate students. The objectives are: 1. To identify the potential benefits a weekly dance class might have on people living with dementia; 2. To bridge the gap between theoretical and practical knowledge for university students in their final year of dance studies; 3. To use mentorship to deepen the knowledge gained in a university environment through hands-on learning and via an established feedback cycle; 4. To show the potential benefits to arts practitioners of working with people with dementia. Incorporating research from my work as an artist-in-residence for Age Concern, I worked to establish classes for people living with dementia. This came together in three parts: i) the use of Tom Kitwood’s model of the five primary social and psychological needs of people living with dementia (1997), ii) a facebook page to share knowledge and research with fellow practitioners, and iii) a feedback cycle based on the Honey and Mumford (2012) cycle of learning between myself, the students, and key stakeholders including Tees Valley Dance and Age UK Darlington. Interviews and close observation were also used to evaluate participants’ experiences and the potential impact of the project on Age UK.This paper was presented as an interactive workshop at Well-Being 2016: The third international conference exploring the multi-dimensions of well-being. The author was subsequently invited to speak at Pint of Science at Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art, Lighting the Fuse: better engagement in public health through arts & media (fuse the Centre for Transnational Research in Public Health), and Older Persons Day at National Dance Agency, Dance City.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 5 Sep 2016
EventWell-Being 2016: The third international conference exploring the multi-dimensions of well-being - Birmingham City University, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Duration: 5 Sep 20166 Sep 2016

Conference

ConferenceWell-Being 2016: The third international conference exploring the multi-dimensions of well-being
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityBirmingham
Period5/09/166/09/16

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dementia
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art
public health
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university
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facebook
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stakeholder
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Cite this

Essex, J. (2016). Good Vibrations: How mentorship can deepen University learning and how dance can begin to answer the primary social and psychological needs of people living with dementia. Paper presented at Well-Being 2016: The third international conference exploring the multi-dimensions of well-being, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
Essex, Jennifer. / Good Vibrations: How mentorship can deepen University learning and how dance can begin to answer the primary social and psychological needs of people living with dementia. Paper presented at Well-Being 2016: The third international conference exploring the multi-dimensions of well-being, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
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abstract = "‘Good Vibrations’ is a pilot project designed to deliver dance classes to people living with dementia and it is supported by Tees Valley Dance and Age UK Darlington. The project was devised by myself with the assistance of two Teesside University undergraduate students. The objectives are: 1. To identify the potential benefits a weekly dance class might have on people living with dementia; 2. To bridge the gap between theoretical and practical knowledge for university students in their final year of dance studies; 3. To use mentorship to deepen the knowledge gained in a university environment through hands-on learning and via an established feedback cycle; 4. To show the potential benefits to arts practitioners of working with people with dementia. Incorporating research from my work as an artist-in-residence for Age Concern, I worked to establish classes for people living with dementia. This came together in three parts: i) the use of Tom Kitwood’s model of the five primary social and psychological needs of people living with dementia (1997), ii) a facebook page to share knowledge and research with fellow practitioners, and iii) a feedback cycle based on the Honey and Mumford (2012) cycle of learning between myself, the students, and key stakeholders including Tees Valley Dance and Age UK Darlington. Interviews and close observation were also used to evaluate participants’ experiences and the potential impact of the project on Age UK.This paper was presented as an interactive workshop at Well-Being 2016: The third international conference exploring the multi-dimensions of well-being. The author was subsequently invited to speak at Pint of Science at Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art, Lighting the Fuse: better engagement in public health through arts & media (fuse the Centre for Transnational Research in Public Health), and Older Persons Day at National Dance Agency, Dance City.",
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Essex, J 2016, 'Good Vibrations: How mentorship can deepen University learning and how dance can begin to answer the primary social and psychological needs of people living with dementia' Paper presented at Well-Being 2016: The third international conference exploring the multi-dimensions of well-being, Birmingham, United Kingdom, 5/09/16 - 6/09/16, .

Good Vibrations: How mentorship can deepen University learning and how dance can begin to answer the primary social and psychological needs of people living with dementia. / Essex, Jennifer.

2016. Paper presented at Well-Being 2016: The third international conference exploring the multi-dimensions of well-being, Birmingham, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperResearchpeer-review

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M3 - Paper

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Essex J. Good Vibrations: How mentorship can deepen University learning and how dance can begin to answer the primary social and psychological needs of people living with dementia. 2016. Paper presented at Well-Being 2016: The third international conference exploring the multi-dimensions of well-being, Birmingham, United Kingdom.