How do we build community cohesion when hate crime is on the rise? Submission to the All Party Parliamentary Group on Hate Crime

Jennifer Paterson, Rupert Brown, Mark A. Walters

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

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Abstract

The aim of this submission is to provide recent empirical data highlighting the incidence of hate crimes, along with the emotional and behavioural impacts of such crimes. In addition, we draw upon this data to provide recommendations on how to build community cohesion. • A large majority of LGB&T and Muslim people have been a victim of a hate crime within the past 3 years (direct victimisation). Even more know someone who has been a victim (indirect victimisation). • Hate crime victimisation, both online and offline, leads people to feel vulnerable and anxious, and can even make direct victims feel ashamed. • Members of targeted communities want the government, police, and Crown Prosecution Service to do more to combat crime. • Restorative justice is preferred to enhanced sentencing as a criminal justice response to hate crimes because it is perceived to be more beneficial to the victim and the offender. • Hate crimes may lead to avoidant behaviours but can also unite members of targeted communities, helping to strengthen the fight against hate crimes.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages11
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 5 Feb 2019

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