Migration of engineered nanoparticles from packaging into food products

Amal Metak, Farhad Nabhani, Stephen N. Connolly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Commercial nanocomposite food packaging in the form of nano-silver containers and coated films were tested in real-food matrices to determine the degree of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) incorporation using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Migration testing was conducted on a range of food materials stored using different packaging materials for 10 days at 40 °C. Simulations using water and 3% acetic acid were also performed to identify the factors that affect migration. Silver nanoparticle migration from nano-silver impregnated polymer containers does not appear to be significant in the case of orange juice; displaying levels corresponding to 5.66 ± 0.02 μgL−1 compared to the migration from coated nano-silver films measured at 28.92 ± 0.01 μgL−1 in the same food, versus the concentration of silver recorded in associated control samples corresponding to 0.41 ± 0.02 μgL−1. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) attached with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were performed to confirm the presence of particles in the nano-scale range indicative of the amount of silver released in nanoparticle as opposed to the ionic form. No organoleptic changes on the samples were observed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)-
JournalLWT - Food Science and Technology
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Jun 2015

Fingerprint

Silver
Packaging
Nanoparticles
Containers
Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry
Atomic absorption spectrometry
Packaging materials
Acetic Acid
Energy dispersive spectroscopy
Nanocomposites
Polymers
Transmission electron microscopy
Scanning electron microscopy
Water
Testing

Cite this

Metak, Amal ; Nabhani, Farhad ; Connolly, Stephen N. / Migration of engineered nanoparticles from packaging into food products. In: LWT - Food Science and Technology. 2015 ; pp. -.
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abstract = "Commercial nanocomposite food packaging in the form of nano-silver containers and coated films were tested in real-food matrices to determine the degree of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) incorporation using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Migration testing was conducted on a range of food materials stored using different packaging materials for 10 days at 40 °C. Simulations using water and 3{\%} acetic acid were also performed to identify the factors that affect migration. Silver nanoparticle migration from nano-silver impregnated polymer containers does not appear to be significant in the case of orange juice; displaying levels corresponding to 5.66 ± 0.02 μgL−1 compared to the migration from coated nano-silver films measured at 28.92 ± 0.01 μgL−1 in the same food, versus the concentration of silver recorded in associated control samples corresponding to 0.41 ± 0.02 μgL−1. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) attached with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were performed to confirm the presence of particles in the nano-scale range indicative of the amount of silver released in nanoparticle as opposed to the ionic form. No organoleptic changes on the samples were observed.",
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Migration of engineered nanoparticles from packaging into food products. / Metak, Amal; Nabhani, Farhad; Connolly, Stephen N.

In: LWT - Food Science and Technology, 10.06.2015, p. -.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Nabhani, Farhad

AU - Connolly, Stephen N.

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AB - Commercial nanocomposite food packaging in the form of nano-silver containers and coated films were tested in real-food matrices to determine the degree of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) incorporation using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Migration testing was conducted on a range of food materials stored using different packaging materials for 10 days at 40 °C. Simulations using water and 3% acetic acid were also performed to identify the factors that affect migration. Silver nanoparticle migration from nano-silver impregnated polymer containers does not appear to be significant in the case of orange juice; displaying levels corresponding to 5.66 ± 0.02 μgL−1 compared to the migration from coated nano-silver films measured at 28.92 ± 0.01 μgL−1 in the same food, versus the concentration of silver recorded in associated control samples corresponding to 0.41 ± 0.02 μgL−1. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) attached with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were performed to confirm the presence of particles in the nano-scale range indicative of the amount of silver released in nanoparticle as opposed to the ionic form. No organoleptic changes on the samples were observed.

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