Occupational performance needs of U.K. military veterans returning to civilian life.

Natalie Greenwell, Christopher McKenna

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

Abstract

Approximately 21,000 personnel are discharged from the U.K military each year (Centre for Social Justice 2014). A number of these veterans experience difficulty during the transition from military to civilian life (Bergman et al 2014). Objective: To determine the occupational performance challenges faced by U.K. military veterans, in order to develop occupational therapists’ understanding of the difficulties that may occur when transitioning. Method: A quantitative design was utilised in the form of an online survey, based on the Occupational Self Assessment (Version 2.2) to assess the occupational performance challenges of thirty-one veterans (Baron et al 2006). Results: The five most frequent occupational performance challenges were managing finances, having a satisfying routine, relaxing and enjoying oneself, expressing oneself to others and having opportunities to participate in valued and liked activity. A high proportion of participants who rated the occupations as a challenge felt they were not important, specifically those relating to personal achievement and socialising with others. Conclusion: A veteran’s transition from military to civilian life can have a significant negative impact on the individuals’ occupational performance of daily life activities. This paper presents a U.K. perspective of the occupational challenges experienced by veterans
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2016
EventCollege of Occupational Therapists Annual Conference 2016 - Harrogate International Centre, Harrogate, United Kingdom
Duration: 28 Jun 201630 Jun 2016
Conference number: 40

Conference

ConferenceCollege of Occupational Therapists Annual Conference 2016
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityHarrogate
Period28/06/1630/06/16

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