Othered, Orientalised, and Opposingly Depicted: The Persistence of Stereotyping of Japan in the British Press

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Abstract

In constructing an image of Japan, Britons often get their knowledge of Japan from factual sources, such as newspapers, news Websites, and documentaries. As such, representations of Japan are constructed almost exclusively by these non-Japanese sources. Studies have repeatedly shown, however, that British news representation of Japan often appeals to stereotypical understandings of Japan. Research on inaccurate reporting of foreign countries usually criticises journalists, but does not look at journalism as an industry, which is driven by a paying audience and a need to generate income; neither are journalists given an opportunity to explain these depictions. By interviewing journalists, this paper explores whether this situation is a matter of a lack of knowledge and an appeal to Orientalist understandings, both of which are common explanations for inaccuracy in the press. This study finds, however, that it is a consequence of broader, systematic problems in the journalism profession.
Original languageEnglish
Article number4
Journalelectronic journal of contemporary japanese studies
Volume19
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 10 Sep 2019

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