Palliative Care after the LCP: A qualitative study of staff experiences

Heather Collins , Peter Raby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The objective of this study is to explore nursing staffs’ perceptions of end of life care, following the removal of the Liverpool Care Pathway (LCP). Thirteen semi-structured, interviews were conducted with nurses working within palliative care. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Three themes emerged: perceptions of the LCP, prevailing issues, and patients’ and families’ experiences. This study suggests that the removal of the pathway has not remedied the issues attributed to it. Further, the nature by which the LCP was removed indicates that the non-expert media plays a negative role, which inhibits the care process. In this respect it is important that ‘insider’ voices are also heard, in order to educate and also redress disinformation. Similarly, broader, persisting, contextual challenges facing staff need addressing in order to prevent a repeat of the issues leading to the removal of the LCP.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBritish Journal of Nursing
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 12 Jul 2019

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Terminal Care
Nursing Staff
Palliative Care
Nurses
Interviews

Cite this

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title = "Palliative Care after the LCP: A qualitative study of staff experiences",
abstract = "The objective of this study is to explore nursing staffs’ perceptions of end of life care, following the removal of the Liverpool Care Pathway (LCP). Thirteen semi-structured, interviews were conducted with nurses working within palliative care. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Three themes emerged: perceptions of the LCP, prevailing issues, and patients’ and families’ experiences. This study suggests that the removal of the pathway has not remedied the issues attributed to it. Further, the nature by which the LCP was removed indicates that the non-expert media plays a negative role, which inhibits the care process. In this respect it is important that ‘insider’ voices are also heard, in order to educate and also redress disinformation. Similarly, broader, persisting, contextual challenges facing staff need addressing in order to prevent a repeat of the issues leading to the removal of the LCP.",
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Palliative Care after the LCP: A qualitative study of staff experiences. / Collins , Heather ; Raby, Peter.

In: British Journal of Nursing, 12.07.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AB - The objective of this study is to explore nursing staffs’ perceptions of end of life care, following the removal of the Liverpool Care Pathway (LCP). Thirteen semi-structured, interviews were conducted with nurses working within palliative care. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Three themes emerged: perceptions of the LCP, prevailing issues, and patients’ and families’ experiences. This study suggests that the removal of the pathway has not remedied the issues attributed to it. Further, the nature by which the LCP was removed indicates that the non-expert media plays a negative role, which inhibits the care process. In this respect it is important that ‘insider’ voices are also heard, in order to educate and also redress disinformation. Similarly, broader, persisting, contextual challenges facing staff need addressing in order to prevent a repeat of the issues leading to the removal of the LCP.

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