Postmodernity and welfare

When worlds collide

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Social policy is just about the last social science subject to take the postmodern challenge, though we have seen a rash of contributions in recent months. These have proved catalytic but may have been presented in a manner that is careless as to the nature of welfare as a boundaried academic realm. These offerings have also illustrated the difficulties involved in splicing poststructural analysis with a historically structural subject. Equally, definitions of social policy generated within the welfare community may also act as a de facto barrier to the postmodern. Consequently we seem to have the makings of a non-debate of incompatible analyses, making even the possibility of a "third position" a remote one. However, a sideways glance at the chronologically more advanced postmodernism - feminism debate offers some hope that a welfare-adapted postmodernity may emerge in the future.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)101-115
Number of pages15
JournalSocial Policy and Administration
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1998

Fingerprint

social policy
welfare
post-modernism
feminism
postmodernism
social science
community
world
Social Policy
analysis

Cite this

@article{23e3f924d7214a158b124b9c27377fdc,
title = "Postmodernity and welfare: When worlds collide",
abstract = "Social policy is just about the last social science subject to take the postmodern challenge, though we have seen a rash of contributions in recent months. These have proved catalytic but may have been presented in a manner that is careless as to the nature of welfare as a boundaried academic realm. These offerings have also illustrated the difficulties involved in splicing poststructural analysis with a historically structural subject. Equally, definitions of social policy generated within the welfare community may also act as a de facto barrier to the postmodern. Consequently we seem to have the makings of a non-debate of incompatible analyses, making even the possibility of a {"}third position{"} a remote one. However, a sideways glance at the chronologically more advanced postmodernism - feminism debate offers some hope that a welfare-adapted postmodernity may emerge in the future.",
author = "John Carter",
year = "1998",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/1467-9515.00091",
language = "English",
volume = "32",
pages = "101--115",
journal = "Social Policy and Administration",
issn = "0144-5596",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd",
number = "2",

}

Postmodernity and welfare : When worlds collide. / Carter, John.

In: Social Policy and Administration, Vol. 32, No. 2, 01.01.1998, p. 101-115.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Postmodernity and welfare

T2 - When worlds collide

AU - Carter, John

PY - 1998/1/1

Y1 - 1998/1/1

N2 - Social policy is just about the last social science subject to take the postmodern challenge, though we have seen a rash of contributions in recent months. These have proved catalytic but may have been presented in a manner that is careless as to the nature of welfare as a boundaried academic realm. These offerings have also illustrated the difficulties involved in splicing poststructural analysis with a historically structural subject. Equally, definitions of social policy generated within the welfare community may also act as a de facto barrier to the postmodern. Consequently we seem to have the makings of a non-debate of incompatible analyses, making even the possibility of a "third position" a remote one. However, a sideways glance at the chronologically more advanced postmodernism - feminism debate offers some hope that a welfare-adapted postmodernity may emerge in the future.

AB - Social policy is just about the last social science subject to take the postmodern challenge, though we have seen a rash of contributions in recent months. These have proved catalytic but may have been presented in a manner that is careless as to the nature of welfare as a boundaried academic realm. These offerings have also illustrated the difficulties involved in splicing poststructural analysis with a historically structural subject. Equally, definitions of social policy generated within the welfare community may also act as a de facto barrier to the postmodern. Consequently we seem to have the makings of a non-debate of incompatible analyses, making even the possibility of a "third position" a remote one. However, a sideways glance at the chronologically more advanced postmodernism - feminism debate offers some hope that a welfare-adapted postmodernity may emerge in the future.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031853868&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/1467-9515.00091

DO - 10.1111/1467-9515.00091

M3 - Article

VL - 32

SP - 101

EP - 115

JO - Social Policy and Administration

JF - Social Policy and Administration

SN - 0144-5596

IS - 2

ER -