Pulmonary O2 uptake on-kinetics in endurance- and sprint-trained master athletes

Nicolas Berger, J. Rittweger, A. Kwiet, I. Michaelis, A. G. Williams, K. Tolfrey, A. M. Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to characterise the V̇O2 kinetic response to moderate intensity cycle exercise in endurance-trained (END) and sprint or power-trained (SPR) track and field master athletes ranging in age from 45 to 85 years. We hypothesised that the time constant (τ) describing the Phase II V̇O2 on-response would be smaller in the END compared to the SPR athletes, and that the τ would become greater with increasing age in both groups. Eighty-four master athletes who were competing at either the British or European Veteran Athletics Championships acted as subjects, and were classified as either END (800 m - marathon; n = 41), or SPR (100-400 m and field events; n = 43) specialists. Subjects completed two 6 minute "step" transitions to a work rate of moderate intensity on a cycle ergometer and pulmonary gas exchange was measured breath-by-breath. Analysis of variance revealed that SPR athletes had slower V̇O2 on-kinetics (i.e., greater τ) compared to END athletes at each of the age groups studied: 46-55 yrs (END: 25 ± vs. SPR: 36 ± 9s; p < 0.10), 56-65 yrs (END: 25 ± 5 vs. SPR: 35 ± 10 s; p < 0.05), 66-75 yrs (END: 29 ± 10 vs. SPR: 40 ± 13s; p < 0.05), and 76-85 yrs (END: 31 ± 10 vs. SPR: 51 ± 18 s; p < 0.05). The V̇O2 on-kinetics became slower with advancing age in the SPR athletes (p < 0.05 between 56-65 and 76-85 yrs) but were not significantly changed in the END athletes. The slower V̇O2 on-kinetics in SPR compared to END master athletes is consistent both with differences in physiology (e.g., muscle fibre type, oxidative/glycolytic capacity) and training between these specialist athletes. Master END athletes have similar τ values to their younger counterparts (∼25 s) suggesting that participation in endurance exercise training limits the slowing of V̇O2 on-kinetics with age in this population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1005-1012
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume27
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2006

Fingerprint

Athletes
Lung
Track and Field
Exercise
Pulmonary Gas Exchange
Veterans
Sports
Analysis of Variance
Age Groups
Muscles

Cite this

Berger, N., Rittweger, J., Kwiet, A., Michaelis, I., Williams, A. G., Tolfrey, K., & Jones, A. M. (2006). Pulmonary O2 uptake on-kinetics in endurance- and sprint-trained master athletes. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 27(12), 1005-1012. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-2006-923860
Berger, Nicolas ; Rittweger, J. ; Kwiet, A. ; Michaelis, I. ; Williams, A. G. ; Tolfrey, K. ; Jones, A. M. / Pulmonary O2 uptake on-kinetics in endurance- and sprint-trained master athletes. In: International Journal of Sports Medicine. 2006 ; Vol. 27, No. 12. pp. 1005-1012.
@article{086d177997ac4c278ca9ca69de54e447,
title = "Pulmonary O2 uptake on-kinetics in endurance- and sprint-trained master athletes",
abstract = "The purpose of this study was to characterise the V̇O2 kinetic response to moderate intensity cycle exercise in endurance-trained (END) and sprint or power-trained (SPR) track and field master athletes ranging in age from 45 to 85 years. We hypothesised that the time constant (τ) describing the Phase II V̇O2 on-response would be smaller in the END compared to the SPR athletes, and that the τ would become greater with increasing age in both groups. Eighty-four master athletes who were competing at either the British or European Veteran Athletics Championships acted as subjects, and were classified as either END (800 m - marathon; n = 41), or SPR (100-400 m and field events; n = 43) specialists. Subjects completed two 6 minute {"}step{"} transitions to a work rate of moderate intensity on a cycle ergometer and pulmonary gas exchange was measured breath-by-breath. Analysis of variance revealed that SPR athletes had slower V̇O2 on-kinetics (i.e., greater τ) compared to END athletes at each of the age groups studied: 46-55 yrs (END: 25 ± vs. SPR: 36 ± 9s; p < 0.10), 56-65 yrs (END: 25 ± 5 vs. SPR: 35 ± 10 s; p < 0.05), 66-75 yrs (END: 29 ± 10 vs. SPR: 40 ± 13s; p < 0.05), and 76-85 yrs (END: 31 ± 10 vs. SPR: 51 ± 18 s; p < 0.05). The V̇O2 on-kinetics became slower with advancing age in the SPR athletes (p < 0.05 between 56-65 and 76-85 yrs) but were not significantly changed in the END athletes. The slower V̇O2 on-kinetics in SPR compared to END master athletes is consistent both with differences in physiology (e.g., muscle fibre type, oxidative/glycolytic capacity) and training between these specialist athletes. Master END athletes have similar τ values to their younger counterparts (∼25 s) suggesting that participation in endurance exercise training limits the slowing of V̇O2 on-kinetics with age in this population.",
author = "Nicolas Berger and J. Rittweger and A. Kwiet and I. Michaelis and Williams, {A. G.} and K. Tolfrey and Jones, {A. M.}",
year = "2006",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1055/s-2006-923860",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "1005--1012",
journal = "International Journal of Sports Medicine",
issn = "0172-4622",
publisher = "Georg Thieme Verlag",
number = "12",

}

Berger, N, Rittweger, J, Kwiet, A, Michaelis, I, Williams, AG, Tolfrey, K & Jones, AM 2006, 'Pulmonary O2 uptake on-kinetics in endurance- and sprint-trained master athletes', International Journal of Sports Medicine, vol. 27, no. 12, pp. 1005-1012. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-2006-923860

Pulmonary O2 uptake on-kinetics in endurance- and sprint-trained master athletes. / Berger, Nicolas; Rittweger, J.; Kwiet, A.; Michaelis, I.; Williams, A. G.; Tolfrey, K.; Jones, A. M.

In: International Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 27, No. 12, 01.12.2006, p. 1005-1012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pulmonary O2 uptake on-kinetics in endurance- and sprint-trained master athletes

AU - Berger, Nicolas

AU - Rittweger, J.

AU - Kwiet, A.

AU - Michaelis, I.

AU - Williams, A. G.

AU - Tolfrey, K.

AU - Jones, A. M.

PY - 2006/12/1

Y1 - 2006/12/1

N2 - The purpose of this study was to characterise the V̇O2 kinetic response to moderate intensity cycle exercise in endurance-trained (END) and sprint or power-trained (SPR) track and field master athletes ranging in age from 45 to 85 years. We hypothesised that the time constant (τ) describing the Phase II V̇O2 on-response would be smaller in the END compared to the SPR athletes, and that the τ would become greater with increasing age in both groups. Eighty-four master athletes who were competing at either the British or European Veteran Athletics Championships acted as subjects, and were classified as either END (800 m - marathon; n = 41), or SPR (100-400 m and field events; n = 43) specialists. Subjects completed two 6 minute "step" transitions to a work rate of moderate intensity on a cycle ergometer and pulmonary gas exchange was measured breath-by-breath. Analysis of variance revealed that SPR athletes had slower V̇O2 on-kinetics (i.e., greater τ) compared to END athletes at each of the age groups studied: 46-55 yrs (END: 25 ± vs. SPR: 36 ± 9s; p < 0.10), 56-65 yrs (END: 25 ± 5 vs. SPR: 35 ± 10 s; p < 0.05), 66-75 yrs (END: 29 ± 10 vs. SPR: 40 ± 13s; p < 0.05), and 76-85 yrs (END: 31 ± 10 vs. SPR: 51 ± 18 s; p < 0.05). The V̇O2 on-kinetics became slower with advancing age in the SPR athletes (p < 0.05 between 56-65 and 76-85 yrs) but were not significantly changed in the END athletes. The slower V̇O2 on-kinetics in SPR compared to END master athletes is consistent both with differences in physiology (e.g., muscle fibre type, oxidative/glycolytic capacity) and training between these specialist athletes. Master END athletes have similar τ values to their younger counterparts (∼25 s) suggesting that participation in endurance exercise training limits the slowing of V̇O2 on-kinetics with age in this population.

AB - The purpose of this study was to characterise the V̇O2 kinetic response to moderate intensity cycle exercise in endurance-trained (END) and sprint or power-trained (SPR) track and field master athletes ranging in age from 45 to 85 years. We hypothesised that the time constant (τ) describing the Phase II V̇O2 on-response would be smaller in the END compared to the SPR athletes, and that the τ would become greater with increasing age in both groups. Eighty-four master athletes who were competing at either the British or European Veteran Athletics Championships acted as subjects, and were classified as either END (800 m - marathon; n = 41), or SPR (100-400 m and field events; n = 43) specialists. Subjects completed two 6 minute "step" transitions to a work rate of moderate intensity on a cycle ergometer and pulmonary gas exchange was measured breath-by-breath. Analysis of variance revealed that SPR athletes had slower V̇O2 on-kinetics (i.e., greater τ) compared to END athletes at each of the age groups studied: 46-55 yrs (END: 25 ± vs. SPR: 36 ± 9s; p < 0.10), 56-65 yrs (END: 25 ± 5 vs. SPR: 35 ± 10 s; p < 0.05), 66-75 yrs (END: 29 ± 10 vs. SPR: 40 ± 13s; p < 0.05), and 76-85 yrs (END: 31 ± 10 vs. SPR: 51 ± 18 s; p < 0.05). The V̇O2 on-kinetics became slower with advancing age in the SPR athletes (p < 0.05 between 56-65 and 76-85 yrs) but were not significantly changed in the END athletes. The slower V̇O2 on-kinetics in SPR compared to END master athletes is consistent both with differences in physiology (e.g., muscle fibre type, oxidative/glycolytic capacity) and training between these specialist athletes. Master END athletes have similar τ values to their younger counterparts (∼25 s) suggesting that participation in endurance exercise training limits the slowing of V̇O2 on-kinetics with age in this population.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33845424370&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1055/s-2006-923860

DO - 10.1055/s-2006-923860

M3 - Article

VL - 27

SP - 1005

EP - 1012

JO - International Journal of Sports Medicine

JF - International Journal of Sports Medicine

SN - 0172-4622

IS - 12

ER -