Relationships between ADHD and dyslexia screening scores and academic performance in undergraduate psychology students: Implications for teaching, learning and assessment

Debbie Pope, Helen Whiteley, Chris Smith, Rachel Lever, Delia Wakelin, Helen Dudiak, Hazel Dewart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The impact of dyslexia and ADHD characteristics on study in higher education has been relatively neglected. This study investigates the prevalence of self-reported dyslexia and ADHD characteristics in 1182 undergraduate psychology students at four universities. Findings suggest that there is a high incidence of undiagnosed students in the 'at risk' categories for both dyslexia and ADHD. Whilst no relationship was found between acheivement data and dyslexia scores, there were strong negative associations between ADHD subscale scores (inattention, hyperactivity or impulsivity and overall ADHD) and academic grades, indicating that those who score higher on ADHD rating scales are performing more poorly in academic tests than their lower scoring peers. Assessment results indicate that specific modes of assessment (multiple choice questions) may pose partcular problems for high inattentive or ADHD scorers. The study suggests a need to focus on the identification and provision of support for students with problems related to ADHD characteristics, and indicates that many students, other than those who 'declare' a learning difficulty, would benefit from further support.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)114-120
JournalPsychology Learning and Teaching
Volume6
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2007

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