Revisiting the Yorkshire Ripper Murders: Interrogating Gender Violence, Sex Work, and Justice

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    329 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Between 1975 and 1980, 13 women, 7 of whom were sex workers, were murdered in the North of England. Aside from the femicide itself, the case was infamous for police failings, misogyny, and victim blaming. The article begins with a discussion of the serial murder of women as a gendered structural phenomenon within the wider context of violence, gender, and arbitrary justice. In support of this, the article revisits the above case to interrogate police reform in England and Wales in the wake of the murders, arguing that despite procedural reform, gendered cultural practices continue to shape justice outcomes for victims of gender violence. In addition, changes to prostitution policy are assessed to highlight how the historical and ongoing Othering and criminalization of street sex workers perpetuates the victimization of this marginalized group of women.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)-
    JournalFeminist Criminology; Published online: 18 Sep 2015
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 8 Sep 2015

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Revisiting the Yorkshire Ripper Murders: Interrogating Gender Violence, Sex Work, and Justice'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this