‘Seen but not heard’: Practitioners work with poverty and the organising out of disadvantaged children’s voices and participation in the early years

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In spite of our apparently connected global environment, people are becoming less connected. Digital communication leads to fewer face-to-face engagements, and many young children are separated from their parents for extended periods. The post-truth phenomenon has resulted in mistrust between policymakers and the people they serve, whilst increased immigration has led to some rich countries adopting a protectionist stance that transforms collaboration into separatism.

At its 2014 meeting, the European Early Childhood Education Research Association’s Young Children’s Perspectives Special Interest Group considered how these issues were affecting young children, particularly the many thousands entering Europe at that time as refugees and migrants escaping conflict in their home countries. Many of those displaced young children found themselves situated on the margins of their new contexts. The feeling of being ‘othered’ can be existential for any young child experiencing liminality, yet a sense of belonging is important for young children’s well-being and development of identity: the feeling of belonging lies at the core of social inclusion. This book, the idea for which arose out of this meeting, is drawn from leading edge empirical studies, and reveals the diverse experiences of young children’s marginalisation.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPerspectives from Young Children on the Margins
EditorsJane Murray, Collette Gray
Place of Publication2 Park Square, Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 4RN, UK
PublisherRoutledge
Chapter1
Pages5-16
Number of pages11
ISBN (Print)9781138370234
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

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poverty
participation
separatism
interest group
refugee
immigration
parents
migrant
well-being
childhood
inclusion
communication
education
experience
time

Cite this

Simpson, D. (2019). ‘Seen but not heard’: Practitioners work with poverty and the organising out of disadvantaged children’s voices and participation in the early years. In J. Murray, & C. Gray (Eds.), Perspectives from Young Children on the Margins (pp. 5-16). 2 Park Square, Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 4RN, UK : Routledge.
Simpson, Donald. / ‘Seen but not heard’: Practitioners work with poverty and the organising out of disadvantaged children’s voices and participation in the early years. Perspectives from Young Children on the Margins. editor / Jane Murray ; Collette Gray. 2 Park Square, Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 4RN, UK : Routledge, 2019. pp. 5-16
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Simpson, D 2019, ‘Seen but not heard’: Practitioners work with poverty and the organising out of disadvantaged children’s voices and participation in the early years. in J Murray & C Gray (eds), Perspectives from Young Children on the Margins. Routledge, 2 Park Square, Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 4RN, UK , pp. 5-16.

‘Seen but not heard’: Practitioners work with poverty and the organising out of disadvantaged children’s voices and participation in the early years. / Simpson, Donald.

Perspectives from Young Children on the Margins. ed. / Jane Murray; Collette Gray. 2 Park Square, Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 4RN, UK : Routledge, 2019. p. 5-16.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Simpson D. ‘Seen but not heard’: Practitioners work with poverty and the organising out of disadvantaged children’s voices and participation in the early years. In Murray J, Gray C, editors, Perspectives from Young Children on the Margins. 2 Park Square, Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 4RN, UK : Routledge. 2019. p. 5-16