Supporting mental health service users to stop smoking: findings from a process evaluation of the implementation of nicotine management policies into two mental health trusts

Susan Jones, Sharon Hamilton, Stephanie Mulrine, Heather Clements

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

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Abstract

Background
People with mental health issues are known to die disproportionately earlier than the general population due, in part, to higher smoking rates (DHSC, 2017; Williams et al., 2015). In response, guidance on smoking reduction was produced by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (2013). This paper reports the process evaluation undertaken in two UK mental health NHS Trusts, following the implemented of nicotine management policies developed in response to this guidance.
Aim
To explore the implementation process and identify opportunities and challenges to normalising the changes.
Methods
A qualitative process evaluation of attitudes towards nicotine management policies and experiences of implementation took place. Data were collected between November 2016-April 2017, using semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of staff (n=51), members of partnering organisations (n=5), service users (n=5) and carers (n=2). Data from service users and carers were analysed together; as was data from staff and partnering organisations. Data were analysed thematically.

Results
Eight themes were identified across the staff data; five themes were identified from the service user experience data. Findings showed that while some staff and service users recognised the benefits of thorough preparation for such radical change, many staff reported receiving mixed messages about how they should act, especially when implementing the new policy when change was resisted. Where there was a culture of consistent support from senior staff, prioritisation and clear communication, becoming smokefree on-site was more likely to be normalised.
Conclusion
The opportunity exists to advocate for change to smoking behaviour in mental health trusts. However, even when change is initiated by national guidance, challenges remain when embedding new ways of behaving.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 5 Sep 2019
EventRoyal College of Nursing International Research Conference 2019 - Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield, United Kingdom
Duration: 3 Sep 20195 Sep 2019
https://www.rcn.org.uk/professional-development/research-and-innovation/research-events/rcn-2019-research-conference

Conference

ConferenceRoyal College of Nursing International Research Conference 2019
Abbreviated titleRCN International Research Conference 2019
CountryUnited Kingdom
CitySheffield
Period3/09/195/09/19
Internet address

Bibliographical note

Poster 49 on linked conference page

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