The discouraging past and promising future of research on innocent suspects’ alibis

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Imagine sitting in a police station, being asked to explain what you were doing and where you were four days earlier to convince the police interviewer of your innocence of a house break-in that took place in your street. Specifically, you are being asked to provide an alibi (Burke et al., 2007). Being motivated to convince the interviewer of your innocence, you are probably certain that you will be able to provide a convincing alibi. However, that might not be the case. In this chapter, I will describe the processes of alibi generation and provision and present factors that may hinder and improve innocent alibi providers’ ability to provide a complete and accurate alibi. I will then discuss interviewing techniques that may improve the processes of alibi generation and provision for innocent suspects. Finally, I will discuss the implications of existing research on innocent suspects’ alibis for practice and theory and suggest future directions for researchers who wish to contribute to this under-studied research domain.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Future of Forensic Psychology
Subtitle of host publicationCore Topics and Emerging Trends
EditorsSara Landström, Pär Anders Granhag, Peter van Koppen
PublisherRoutledge
Chapter9
Pages95-104
Number of pages10
ISBN (Print)9781032311944, 9781032311951
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Nov 2022

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