The discursive “othering” of Jews and Muslims in the Britain First solidarity patrol

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this paper, critical discursive psychology is used to analyse the Islamophobic discourse by the far-right party Britain First in its “solidarity patrol” video. Britain First patrolled in Golders Green, North London, to show support for Jewish communities following the ISIS shooting at the kosher supermarket in Paris on January 9, 2015. The Charlie Hebdo shooting and the shooting at the kosher supermarket (as well as other attacks by members of the Islamic State) have led to Muslims being seen as a threat to Britain and exposed to Islamophobic attacks and racial abuse. This presents far-right parties in the United Kingdom with the dilemma of appearing moderate and mainstream in their anti-Islamic stance. The analysis focuses on how Britain First used the shooting at the kosher supermarket in order to construct Jews as under threat from Islam. The analysis also includes visual communication in the solidarity patrol video that was used to provide “evidence” that Britain First supported Jewish communities. Results are discussed in light of how Britain First used aligning with Jews in order to appear as “reasonable” in projecting its anti-Islamic ideology and how critical discursive psychology can be used to show how conflicting social identities are constructed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)365-377
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Community and Applied Social Psychology
Volume28
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Aug 2018

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critical psychology
Jews
Islam
Jew
solidarity
Muslim
video
threat
Psychology
visual communication
Social Identification
Paris
community
abuse
ideology
Communication
discourse
evidence

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abstract = "In this paper, critical discursive psychology is used to analyse the Islamophobic discourse by the far-right party Britain First in its “solidarity patrol” video. Britain First patrolled in Golders Green, North London, to show support for Jewish communities following the ISIS shooting at the kosher supermarket in Paris on January 9, 2015. The Charlie Hebdo shooting and the shooting at the kosher supermarket (as well as other attacks by members of the Islamic State) have led to Muslims being seen as a threat to Britain and exposed to Islamophobic attacks and racial abuse. This presents far-right parties in the United Kingdom with the dilemma of appearing moderate and mainstream in their anti-Islamic stance. The analysis focuses on how Britain First used the shooting at the kosher supermarket in order to construct Jews as under threat from Islam. The analysis also includes visual communication in the solidarity patrol video that was used to provide “evidence” that Britain First supported Jewish communities. Results are discussed in light of how Britain First used aligning with Jews in order to appear as “reasonable” in projecting its anti-Islamic ideology and how critical discursive psychology can be used to show how conflicting social identities are constructed.",
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The discursive “othering” of Jews and Muslims in the Britain First solidarity patrol. / Burke, Shani.

In: Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology, Vol. 28, No. 5, 08.08.2018, p. 365-377.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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