The impact of James I's accession on the North-East of England

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Abstract

In the final, long, drawn-out days of Elizabeth I's life, Sir John Carey, the deputy governor of the garrison town of Berwick upon Tweed , appealed urgently to Sir Robert Cecil. 'What should I do here,' he demanded, 'not knowing how or for whom to keep this place, being only in the devil's mouth, a place that will be first assailed, and I not being instructed what course to hold' (Salisbury 1902-65, vol. 12, 677). 1 These were indeed perilous times. With no heir to the English throne formally nominated, he was terrified that he would be an early victim should the Scottish King James VI attempt to take England by force on the death of the aged and ailing Queen. He was not alone in his unease, for King James himself was conscious that his forces should be in readiness should he need to defend his interest and he had said as much in letters to his English correspondents. Meanwhile, rumours were circulating throughout Europe. 2 But Sir John Carey, not a native Northumbrian, was also articulating contemporary estimations about the character of the north-east of England; as remote from central government, ignorant, fiendish, volatile and extremely vulnerable.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2004
Event1603: The Historical and Cultural Consequences of the Accession of James I - University of Hull, United Kingdom
Duration: 27 Jun 200328 Jun 2003

Conference

Conference1603: The Historical and Cultural Consequences of the Accession of James I
CountryUnited Kingdom
Period27/06/0328/06/03

Bibliographical note

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    Newton, D. (2004). The impact of James I's accession on the North-East of England. Paper presented at 1603: The Historical and Cultural Consequences of the Accession of James I, United Kingdom.