The impact of school exclusion zone planning guidance on the number and type of food outlets in an English local authority: A longitudinal analysis

Heather Brown, Scott Kirkman, Viviana Albani, Louis Goffe, Nasima Akhter, Bruce Hollingsworth, Stephanie von Hinke, Amelia Lake

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The use of planning policy to manage and create a healthy food environment has become a popular
policy tool for local governments in England. To date there has been no evaluation on their short term impact on the built environment. We assess if planning guidance restricting new fast
food outlets within 400 metres of a secondary school, influences the food environment in the local
authority of Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK. We have administrative data on all food outlets in Newcastle
3 years pre-intervention 2012-2015, the intervention year 2016, and three years’ post-intervention
2016-2019. We employ a difference-in-difference approach comparing postcodes within the school
fast food outlet exclusion zone to those outside the fast-food exclusion zones. In
the short term (3 years), planning guidance to limit the number of new fast-food outlets in a school exclusion zone did not have a statistically significant impact on the food environment when compared with a control zone.
Original languageEnglish
Article number102600
Number of pages38
JournalHealth and Place
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Jun 2021

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