The mitochondrial genome of UK (non-native) Dikerogammarus haemobaphes (Amphipoda: Gammaridae) informs upon Dikerogammarus evolution, invasions and associated microparasites

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Abstract The amphipod Dikerogammarus haemobaphes
is a high-risk carrier of parasites that impact
wildlife in its non-native range. Studies using the
mitochondrial genes, Cytochrome Oxidase Sub-Unit 1
(cox1) and small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene (16S),
provide some nucleotide detail for understanding the
evolution and phylogeography of this species. Despite
this, the origins of the invasion remain unknown, as do
the origins of its parasites. This study provides the full
annotated mitochondrial genome (15,460 bp) of D.
haemobaphes, consisting of 2 rRNAs, 24 tRNAs and
14 protein coding genes. Mitochondrial genes from the
UK isolate are compared to existing data on NCBI and
are used in a concatenated phylogenetic approach and
identify D. haemobaphes as an early member of the
Gammaridae (Amphipoda). Viral, bacterial, protistan
and microsporidian parasites are present across the
Gammaridae, including D. haemobaphes, suggesting
the ancestor of the Gammaridae harboured related
diseases, and that further screening of amphipods is
likely to reveal further microparasite diversity. This
correlation suggests that other gammarid invaders
have the potential to harbour a range of microparasites.
The mitochondrial genome of this species will
act a resource to facilitate our understanding of
geneflow, disease epidemiology and evolutionary
history in this invasion-disease model.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)229–242
JournalHydrobiologia
Volume847
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Oct 2019

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The mitochondrial genome of UK (non-native) Dikerogammarus haemobaphes (Amphipoda: Gammaridae) informs upon Dikerogammarus evolution, invasions and associated microparasites'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this