The question of question types in police interviews: A review of the literature from a psychological and linguistic perspective

Gavin E Oxburgh, Trond Myklebust, Tim Grant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The past two decades has seen a plethora of papers and academic research conducted on investigative interviews with victims, witnesses and suspected offenders, with a particular focus on questioning techniques and typologies. However, despite this research, there still remain significant discrepancies amongst academic researchers and practitioners over how best to describe types of questions. This article considers the available literature relating to interviews with children and adults from both a psychological and linguistic perspective. In particular, we examine how different types of questions are described, and explore the discrepancies between competing definitions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)46-66
JournalInternational Journal of Speech, Language and the Law
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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police
linguistics
interview
witness
offender
typology
literature

Bibliographical note

The past two decades has seen a plethora of papers and academic research conducted on investigative interviews with victims, witnesses and suspected offenders, with a particular focus on questioning techniques and typologies. However, despite this research, there still remain significant discrepancies amongst academic researchers and practitioners over how best to describe types of questions. This article considers the available literature relating to interviews with children and adults from both a psychological and linguistic perspective. In particular, we examine how different types of questions are described, and explore the discrepancies between competing definitions.

Cite this

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The question of question types in police interviews: A review of the literature from a psychological and linguistic perspective. / Oxburgh, Gavin E; Myklebust, Trond; Grant, Tim.

In: International Journal of Speech, Language and the Law, Vol. 17, No. 1, 2010, p. 46-66.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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