The value of eye-tracking technology in the analysis and interpretations of skeletal remains: A pilot study

Sherry Nakhaeizadeh, Ruth M. Morgan, Viktor Olsson, Martin Arvidsson, Tim Thompson

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Abstract

This initial study is the first to use eye-trackers as a tool in order to study gaze pattern strategies and decision making processes involved in the assessment of skeletal remains. Three experienced participants were asked to wear eye-tracking glasses (Tobii Pro Glasses 2) when estimating sex and age-at-death of one set of skeletal remains from a known archeological sample. The study assessed participants' fixation points (the features of the skeleton focused on), fixation duration (the total time spent on each assessment and feature) as well as visit count and duration (the total number of visits and the duration of visits to particular areas). The preliminary results of this study identified differences in gaze “strategies” with regards to fixation points, visit duration, and visit counts between the participants. The data generated provide a starting point for assessing how such technologies could be used in order to more fully understand the decision making processes involved in forensic anthropological interpretations and their role in forensic reconstructions.
Original languageEnglish
JournalScience & Justice
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 Aug 2019

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