Therapy students' recommendations of physical activity for managing persistent low back pain in older adults

Cormac Ryan, Patricia Schofield, Denis J. Martin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Negative views of older adults can lead to suboptimal care. For older adults with persistent low back pain (LBP), promotion of physical activity by health care professionals is important. Health care professionals' views of older adults are influenced by their training. This study aimed to compare recommendations for physical activity for managing persistent LBP offered by students in physiotherapy and occupational therapy to an older person vs. a younger person. In a cross-sectional online survey, participants (N = 77) randomly received a vignette of either a 40-yr-old or 70-yr-old patient with persistent LBP. Other than age, the vignettes were identical. There was no difference between the younger and older vignettes in the likelihood of participants making overall appropriate physical activity recommendations - 63% vs. 59%, OR (95%CI) = 1.19 (0.48-2.99), p = .71 - although there was a trend toward age bias on recommendations specific to daily activity. Postqualification education may be where ageist views need to be addressed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)309-318
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Aging and Physical Activity
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2013

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