Training peers to support older people with chronic low back pain following physiotherapy discharge: a feasibility study

Kay Cooper, Llinos Mary Jehu, Susan Klein, Blair H. Smith, Patricia Schofield

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Abstract

Objective: To determine the feasibility and acceptability of a training programme for peer volunteers to support older adults with chronic low back pain (CLBP) following discharge from physiotherapy.Design: Feasibility study.Setting: Community-based.Participants17 adults (4 male, 13 female) with CLBP or experience of supporting someone with CLBP enrolled and 12 (2 male, 10 female) completed the volunteer training. Intervention: Volunteers took part in a face-to-face or blended delivery peer support training programme based on the Mental Health Foundation’s “Principles into Practice” and adapted for CLBP by the study team. Main outcome measures. Recruitment/retention rates; demographics; time & resources used to deliver training; training evaluation (questionnaire); knowledge questionnaire, and self-efficacy questionnaire.Results17 participants enrolled on the training programme (11 face-to-face, 6 blended delivery). 12 (71%) completed the training (73% face-to-face, 67% blended delivery). The training was positively evaluated. All but two participants passed the knowledge quiz at the end of the training, and the majority of self-efficacy scores (90%) were high.Conclusions: It is feasible to develop, implement and evaluate a peer support training programme for the facilitation of CLBP self-management in older adults following discharge from physiotherapy. Blended delivery of training may facilitate the recruitment of greater numbers of peer support volunteers in future studies. Supported self-management of CLBP pain is widely recommended but can be difficult to achieve. Peer support might be a promising method of facilitating CLBP self-management without additional burden to health services, and should be further evaluated in a larger study.
Original languageEnglish
JournalPhysiotherapy
Early online date13 Jul 2017
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 13 Jul 2017

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Feasibility Studies
Low Back Pain
Volunteers
Self Care
Education
Self Efficacy
Pain Management
Health Services
Mental Health
Demography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pain
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

@article{8dd7641672e749209de4edd9f7f38188,
title = "Training peers to support older people with chronic low back pain following physiotherapy discharge: a feasibility study",
abstract = "Objective: To determine the feasibility and acceptability of a training programme for peer volunteers to support older adults with chronic low back pain (CLBP) following discharge from physiotherapy.Design: Feasibility study.Setting: Community-based.Participants17 adults (4 male, 13 female) with CLBP or experience of supporting someone with CLBP enrolled and 12 (2 male, 10 female) completed the volunteer training. Intervention: Volunteers took part in a face-to-face or blended delivery peer support training programme based on the Mental Health Foundation’s “Principles into Practice” and adapted for CLBP by the study team. Main outcome measures. Recruitment/retention rates; demographics; time & resources used to deliver training; training evaluation (questionnaire); knowledge questionnaire, and self-efficacy questionnaire.Results17 participants enrolled on the training programme (11 face-to-face, 6 blended delivery). 12 (71{\%}) completed the training (73{\%} face-to-face, 67{\%} blended delivery). The training was positively evaluated. All but two participants passed the knowledge quiz at the end of the training, and the majority of self-efficacy scores (90{\%}) were high.Conclusions: It is feasible to develop, implement and evaluate a peer support training programme for the facilitation of CLBP self-management in older adults following discharge from physiotherapy. Blended delivery of training may facilitate the recruitment of greater numbers of peer support volunteers in future studies. Supported self-management of CLBP pain is widely recommended but can be difficult to achieve. Peer support might be a promising method of facilitating CLBP self-management without additional burden to health services, and should be further evaluated in a larger study.",
author = "Kay Cooper and Jehu, {Llinos Mary} and Susan Klein and Smith, {Blair H.} and Patricia Schofield",
year = "2017",
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day = "13",
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language = "English",
journal = "Physiotherapy",
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Training peers to support older people with chronic low back pain following physiotherapy discharge: a feasibility study. / Cooper, Kay; Jehu, Llinos Mary; Klein, Susan; Smith, Blair H.; Schofield, Patricia.

In: Physiotherapy, 13.07.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Training peers to support older people with chronic low back pain following physiotherapy discharge: a feasibility study

AU - Cooper, Kay

AU - Jehu, Llinos Mary

AU - Klein, Susan

AU - Smith, Blair H.

AU - Schofield, Patricia

PY - 2017/7/13

Y1 - 2017/7/13

N2 - Objective: To determine the feasibility and acceptability of a training programme for peer volunteers to support older adults with chronic low back pain (CLBP) following discharge from physiotherapy.Design: Feasibility study.Setting: Community-based.Participants17 adults (4 male, 13 female) with CLBP or experience of supporting someone with CLBP enrolled and 12 (2 male, 10 female) completed the volunteer training. Intervention: Volunteers took part in a face-to-face or blended delivery peer support training programme based on the Mental Health Foundation’s “Principles into Practice” and adapted for CLBP by the study team. Main outcome measures. Recruitment/retention rates; demographics; time & resources used to deliver training; training evaluation (questionnaire); knowledge questionnaire, and self-efficacy questionnaire.Results17 participants enrolled on the training programme (11 face-to-face, 6 blended delivery). 12 (71%) completed the training (73% face-to-face, 67% blended delivery). The training was positively evaluated. All but two participants passed the knowledge quiz at the end of the training, and the majority of self-efficacy scores (90%) were high.Conclusions: It is feasible to develop, implement and evaluate a peer support training programme for the facilitation of CLBP self-management in older adults following discharge from physiotherapy. Blended delivery of training may facilitate the recruitment of greater numbers of peer support volunteers in future studies. Supported self-management of CLBP pain is widely recommended but can be difficult to achieve. Peer support might be a promising method of facilitating CLBP self-management without additional burden to health services, and should be further evaluated in a larger study.

AB - Objective: To determine the feasibility and acceptability of a training programme for peer volunteers to support older adults with chronic low back pain (CLBP) following discharge from physiotherapy.Design: Feasibility study.Setting: Community-based.Participants17 adults (4 male, 13 female) with CLBP or experience of supporting someone with CLBP enrolled and 12 (2 male, 10 female) completed the volunteer training. Intervention: Volunteers took part in a face-to-face or blended delivery peer support training programme based on the Mental Health Foundation’s “Principles into Practice” and adapted for CLBP by the study team. Main outcome measures. Recruitment/retention rates; demographics; time & resources used to deliver training; training evaluation (questionnaire); knowledge questionnaire, and self-efficacy questionnaire.Results17 participants enrolled on the training programme (11 face-to-face, 6 blended delivery). 12 (71%) completed the training (73% face-to-face, 67% blended delivery). The training was positively evaluated. All but two participants passed the knowledge quiz at the end of the training, and the majority of self-efficacy scores (90%) were high.Conclusions: It is feasible to develop, implement and evaluate a peer support training programme for the facilitation of CLBP self-management in older adults following discharge from physiotherapy. Blended delivery of training may facilitate the recruitment of greater numbers of peer support volunteers in future studies. Supported self-management of CLBP pain is widely recommended but can be difficult to achieve. Peer support might be a promising method of facilitating CLBP self-management without additional burden to health services, and should be further evaluated in a larger study.

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SN - 0031-9406

ER -